Cafe Chat Discussion

  • mermaid
    mermaid
    Posted on:
    22nd Oct 2009 11:50pm

    Last Post 2nd Apr 2012
    Replies     54

    Monthly income turns to charity greed

    Some time ago I volunteered for a local charity believing my support of those in need were met. In our weekly meeting the manager shared an email from upper level management for all stores to increase monthly sales targets yes targets, from $2,000 to $3,500.00. This was met with much distaste amongst the large pool of volunteers, who questioned why? The manager shared the same view and set off to identify the need vs greed syndrome and this is what we learned....... more than $210 billion of institutionalised ''charity'' is now part of Australia's society and is embedded in the economy rather than being an optional extra. Old-fashioned charity is just $9 billion, 4 per cent of the total or less than 3 per cent if we acknowledge governments' financial support to charities. There are approximately 10,400 charities in Australia with almost 12,000 outlets or branches. 120,000 staff are employees vs tens of thousands of volunteers; this figure does not include volunteers who work for schools, clubs and associations. Total wages are about $3.9 billion. Salvation Army (eastern and southern divisions only) revenue approx $650 million, smaller average less than $800,000 per year (a extraordinary figure). Compare these figures to an average business employing staff, with a revenue of $3.8 million - or approx five times the average charity. Reality is charities are a business and these figures are Australian, given the number of charity organisations in Australia also exist worldwide the math just does not add up. When presenting these figures to senior management, the manager was told rising inflation restricted the charity from performing. The result, the manager and 3/4's of the pooled volunteers left and within 2 years the charity have employed 4 managers. The days of charity truly have gone! What are your thoughts?

  • meow
    meow
    Posted on:
    11th Dec 2009 03:50pm

    meow says: It's absoulutly discusting! I couldn't 'work' for a charity. The money they pay their employees should be going to the charity. If I was getting paid for chariy work I would feel like a thief, steeling from a charity. I would have to donate it back, I'd feel too guilty.

  • jen
    jen
    Posted on:
    23rd Nov 2010 03:39pm

    meow says: It's absoulutly discusting! I couldn't 'work' for a charity. The money they pay their employees should be going to the charity. If I was getting paid for chariy work I would feel like a thief,...

    jen says: It is not the poor worker that rips the charity off, they get VERY VERY low pay and work extremely hard at what they do, it is the owner of the company that makes the big bucks and rips off, they are driving around in $50,000 plus luxury cars, luxury million dollar homes and having a grand old time, if they weren't so greedy the charity they represent would make a lot more money. Very little of the takings goes to the charity organisation. Unfortunately if we didn't have these companies we would not get anything for the charities and they do need lots of support. But running a charity company is usually big business for the owner. But there and then look at the big CEO'S in charge of banks and other companies. All I can say is they are a VERY VERY GREEDY LOT without a conscience. P.S. It wouldn't hurt for some of these SUPER RICH to fork out a bit more than they do. The only reason they give to charity is for tax purposes, you can bet on it they don't give more than they have to. Cheers Jen

  • Natacha
    Natacha
    Posted on:
    20th Dec 2010 06:44pm

    jen says: It is not the poor worker that rips the charity off, they get VERY VERY low pay and work extremely hard at what they do, it is the owner of the company that makes the big bucks and rips off, they...

    Natacha says: Thanks, Jen. I didn't think the paid workers got very much anyway and they seem to try their best. Have you heard of plans for the Robin Hood tax? I hope they introduce this worldwide!

  • buttons
    buttons
    Posted on:
    11th Jan 2011 03:57pm

    meow says: It's absoulutly discusting! I couldn't 'work' for a charity. The money they pay their employees should be going to the charity. If I was getting paid for chariy work I would feel like a thief,...

    buttons says: I thought most charity work was unpaid. I know where I live to work in a charity shop or help with meals for the unfortunate is all unpaid. But at the same time it is unreal the number of people you see lining up for a free meal and you know they aren't a charity case is quite disturbing to me.

  • SereneBee
    SereneBee
    Posted on:
    5th Oct 2011 02:14pm

    buttons says: I thought most charity work was unpaid. I know where I live to work in a charity shop or help with meals for the unfortunate is all unpaid. But at the same time it is unreal the number of people...

    SereneBee says: Just about all the charity op-shops in the Perth metro area are staffed by volunteers - although Good Sammies workers are paid and work much longer hours! But I was on a bus not long ago and heard two young people discussing the best way to play one charity against the others. They get vouchers from one and then work their way through a list plus they were discussing where to "score" [their words] free food. And on this subject, when I was at the Dentist last year I was speaking with a fellow patient who said that whilst his situation has changed and he could now afford not to be homeless he much preferred to sleep out. Apparently, there are many places in Perth beneficial to the homeless and not-so-homeless!

  • sherri
    sherri
    Posted on:
    22nd Nov 2011 01:03pm

    SereneBee says: Just about all the charity op-shops in the Perth metro area are staffed by volunteers - although Good Sammies workers are paid and work much longer hours! But I was on a bus not long ago and...

    sherri says: In Hobart we have a 'One agency policy' - and someone who comes in is informed (and gives consent to) their name (only) being shared with the other agencies.

    In this way we were able to prevent 'double dipping' -which in turn meant that we could give more to more.

    I am aware that other states do not use this policy, and thought it was because physical distances that do not apply in a little place like Hobart meant that it was not possible for people to attend more than one agency in a day. Perhaps it is time for Perth orgs to consider doing something similar.

    As for homelessness as a lifestyle choice....it can actually be more expensive to be homeless than to have a fixed address. I rather suspect that the young man you spoke to will eventually come to realise this and eventually put down a few more roots as he matures as a person and his needs change. (But it DOES underscore the point that income security/poverty is the major issue that needs to be addressed in Australia)

  • karts52
    karts52
    Posted on:
    6th Mar 2010 12:15pm

    karts52 says: I agree with what you say mermaid, but would like to say that they do not all work the same way.
    All large charities need a certain percentage of paid staff as the job is rather a large one.
    I work as a volunteer for the MS Society in SA doing readathon presentations in schools in my area and get feed back on where the funds go and why they need to fund raise. As a person with MS I appreciate how this fund raising is beneficial to myself and others in my position. Gov. funding is small so fund raising is very necessary.
    My hubby is a Diabetic and the situation is the same. They are two charities I support as I know first hand how they work.
    For years I always gave to the Salvo's believing their publicity until my eldest daughter and her friend (18 & 17 years old) found themselves in dire straits when my daughter fled the state after we had escaped from my violent 1st marriage. When she turned 18 he targeted her and she fled but ended up needing some help when stranded, the Salvo's turned them away because they did not have drug problems or kid's??? So I have never given to them again as they did not live up to their PR. They turned their backs on 2 young girls in a strange place without money or a place to stay until they could be rescued by friends of family, I was totally disgusted.

  • bigred
    bigred
    Posted on:
    17th Mar 2010 06:35pm

    bigred says: My thoughts exactly. WHAT I hate is it is all donated and some (ALL IN MY AREA) charge nearly antique prices for a lot of stuff, and the prices of clothes you can buy them cheaper when Kmart have them on end of season sale. My niece was a on a single mothers pension and wanted to leave a deposit on a lounge suite to be kept for 2 days (at the Salvos) and was told they couldn't do that, so as far as I am concerned all my stuff goes to friends and gets passed around then whats left goes to the tip, SORRY I do not have any time for them anymore, CHARITY I think not.

  • clutterbugs
    clutterbugs
    Posted on:
    20th Apr 2010 12:21am

    bigred says: My thoughts exactly. WHAT I hate is it is all donated and some (ALL IN MY AREA) charge nearly antique prices for a lot of stuff, and the prices of clothes you can buy them cheaper when Kmart have...

    clutterbugs says: I totally agree with you bigred. Prices in op shops can be astronomically high. Have you ever tried donating goods to them. If it's a piece of furniture that has a few scratches on it or the toys aren't in perfect condition or the books are a bit old, the shops don't want it. They only want the best stuff and the rest gets thrown away. Ever noticed the big rubbish bins at the back of their shops?

  • grandy01
    grandy01
    Posted on:
    29th Apr 2010 11:57am

    clutterbugs says: I totally agree with you bigred. Prices in op shops can be astronomically high. Have you ever tried donating goods to them. If it's a piece of furniture that has a few scratches on it or the...

    grandy01 says: Oh yes they are very choosey with what they will take. My daughter tried to donate a television that was in excellent condition and not very old, although it wasn't a plasma or lcd and they refused to take it. My daughter gave it away to a lady outside the shop who was most grateful for it.

  • SereneBee
    SereneBee
    Posted on:
    17th Oct 2010 05:33pm

    grandy01 says: Oh yes they are very choosey with what they will take. My daughter tried to donate a television that was in excellent condition and not very old, although it wasn't a plasma or lcd and they...

    SereneBee says: Vinnies -and several others- can no longer sell electrical items because our society has become so litigious it's just not worth any charity's while to be sued!

  • mermaid
    mermaid
    Posted on:
    5th Oct 2011 12:46pm

    SereneBee says: Vinnies -and several others- can no longer sell electrical items because our society has become so litigious it's just not worth any charity's while to be sued!

    mermaid says: Actually Sarah there are some St Vincent Charities who chose to take electrical items and some who choose not to. This is based on what all charities base their logic with goods of this nature on....If it's older than 5 years we don't want it, if the store your offering the item to does not have someone qualified to check the electrical item they will not take it. The cost of putting a volunteer through a course is less than $500 case rested.

  • SereneBee
    SereneBee
    Posted on:
    5th Oct 2011 02:20pm

    mermaid says: Actually Sarah there are some St Vincent Charities who chose to take electrical items and some who choose not to. This is based on what all charities base their logic with goods of this nature...

    SereneBee says: I expect Mermaid it depends on in which Australian state you are~~ I can only speak for the Perth metro area in WA. I've only been with Vinnies for four years and I've heard that before our society became so litigious Vinnies did indeed sell electrical items. Sometimes, it's easier and kinder to take the whole donation. There's a Good Sammies near us and we give them any electrical items as they still sell them.

  • grandy01
    grandy01
    Posted on:
    29th Apr 2010 11:57am

    clutterbugs says: I totally agree with you bigred. Prices in op shops can be astronomically high. Have you ever tried donating goods to them. If it's a piece of furniture that has a few scratches on it or the...

    grandy01 says: Oh yes they are very choosey with what they will take. My daughter tried to donate a television that was in excellent condition and not very old, although it wasn't a plasma or lcd and they refused to take it. My daughter gave it away to a lady outside the shop who was most grateful for it.

  • david
    david
    Posted on:
    29th Apr 2010 06:29pm

    grandy01 says: Oh yes they are very choosey with what they will take. My daughter tried to donate a television that was in excellent condition and not very old, although it wasn't a plasma or lcd and they...

    david says: i do believe in giving donations or items needed by charitable organisations.salvation army is one.but i do object to the ceo"s who get 100,000 dollars per year before any money is handed out.david

  • bubbles
    bubbles
    Posted on:
    1st Dec 2010 02:59pm

    david says: i do believe in giving donations or items needed by charitable organisations.salvation army is one.but i do object to the ceo"s who get 100,000 dollars per year before any money is handed out.david

    bubbles says: The thing that gets me is that a charity can sponser a television show two nights a week and this has started alarm bells going off in my head where is the charity in that.

  • berger123
    berger123
    Posted on:
    27th Nov 2010 12:30pm

    grandy01 says: Oh yes they are very choosey with what they will take. My daughter tried to donate a television that was in excellent condition and not very old, although it wasn't a plasma or lcd and they...

    berger123 says: What I don't understand is what are the op shops there for? I used to think that they were there to provide low price items for people in need, but I have heard so many people who are on reasonable incomes (in some cases, LARGE incomes) say "I scored a bargain" at the op shop. So maybe my original understanding was wrong?

    Or has the client base changed from the needy to the wealthy? If the funds from the op shop were going back to the needy in some way, that would be great, but I fear that with inflation that the funds mostly get ploughed back into the running of the op shop, which means it just supports itself and nothing/no-one else.

    Please don't misunderstand me, I am all for charities supporting people, but not charities supporting themselves to no other end. If they do this, they are just a business and no longer a charity, IMHO.

  • SereneBee
    SereneBee
    Posted on:
    5th Oct 2011 02:27pm

    berger123 says: What I don't understand is what are the op shops there for? I used to think that they were there to provide low price items for people in need, but I have heard so many people who are on...

    SereneBee says: The thing is berger123 that an op=shop serves two purposes. It's an opportunity for people -anyone- to get a bargain and by doing so the charity has the opportunity to do good in the community. Just yesterday, we had two people with vouchers go out with $100.00 worth of goods each. People in dire straits have 2 community-minded volunteers go out and assess their situation; if proven they are given the voucher for what they really need. Two years ago I had two people who needed black clothes for funeral purposes come in with a voucher. As an aside, I annoyed my sister by wearing navy blue to your Mother's funeral~~

  • SereneBee
    SereneBee
    Posted on:
    5th Oct 2011 02:28pm

    SereneBee says: The thing is berger123 that an op=shop serves two purposes. It's an opportunity for people -anyone- to get a bargain and by doing so the charity has the opportunity to do good in the community. ...

    SereneBee says: Actually that's a typo -- it was OUR Mum's not yours ------- sorry about that. :-{

  • rosal
    rosal
    Posted on:
    16th Feb 2011 03:20pm

    grandy01 says: Oh yes they are very choosey with what they will take. My daughter tried to donate a television that was in excellent condition and not very old, although it wasn't a plasma or lcd and they...

    rosal says: That very bad...they should accept whatever you can give no matter how small or big it is, as long as it's come from the heart. I am sure poor people would love that.

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