Cafe Chat Discussion

  • JennyC.
    JennyC.
    Posted on:
    17th Mar 2011 09:09am

    Last Post 2nd Mar 2014
    Replies     20

    Mature age job seeking

    Mature age job seekers have battles looking for work.After looking for work and sending off many applications for positions in the last 4 months it is easy to see now why even the young give up.It is either age or experience against you.They want young but lots of experience.Another thing that is annoying and have heard this from the young job seeker.They dont reply to your enquiry for work or even let you know a Job has been filled most of the time.So rude.

  • anna
    anna
    Posted on:
    18th Apr 2011 09:24pm

    anna says: I honestly do not know what the Employers want these days, maybe they are not employing so much because of so many shops around, plus shops going to the wall is a worry. The one thing I did was learn as much as I could about different areas of the work industry by volunteering or study. Cleaning gave me a chance to have a wage on the side. Good luck.

  • cas
    cas
    Posted on:
    19th Apr 2011 12:40pm

    cas says: It is difficult I know - from experience. I had given up work to move interstate - aged in my late 50's but not yet ready to call it a day. I became put myself on the books of an employment agency who sent me on a few assignments, then out of the blue, one of their clients asked me to take on the work full-time! Wonderful. Even if this is not you, perhaps working at different places through an agency (temping) might be the thing for you. I found lots of friends too. I agree that many of the enquiries you send out dont respond, and that is downright rude - but try the temping and see how you go. LOL

  • Professor
    Professor
    Posted on:
    19th Apr 2011 01:24pm

    Professor says: JennyC. I can truly understand your sentiments, the Government says there is a severe employee shortage in Australia however, Employers all over this Country seem to be more moronic and discriminating than ever before. I believe that my circumstances have set a World Record for job seeking, I have two Bachelor Degrees and many more qualifications in numerous fields, am 57 years young and sent off at least 2,000 job applications in a two & a half year period, over this time I also attended over 87 face to face job interviews without being offered a position. Most feedback I received, after chasing up these employers for an explanation said I was over qualified or too intimidating for the position vacant. Two & a half years of extreme effort in job seeking led to me being diagnosed with Lymphocytic Leukaemia. I believe it developed due to excessive stress.

    Good Luck with your job seeking efforts.

    Professor

  • chickclaire
    chickclaire
    Posted on:
    16th Oct 2013 05:56pm

    Professor says: JennyC. I can truly understand your sentiments, the Government says there is a severe employee shortage in Australia however, Employers all over this Country seem to be more moronic and...

    chickclaire says: That is a truely tragic tale. You deserve feedback from all those 87 face to face job interviews. Sometimes it's best to ask prospective employers for feedback. Persuade yourself to get the feedback you surely deserve

  • Mondayitis
    Mondayitis
    Posted on:
    19th Apr 2011 04:25pm

    Mondayitis says: Australia isnt very accepting of Maturage age employees. I've read recent articles claiming that things are changing in that regard but I doubt they were written by anyone actively seeking work so I 'm not convinced. Sending applications through the main job seeking websites appears to be an exercise in frustration. What else are you doing besides applying online. Like some else said, volunteering is helpful to gain new or build existing skills. Networking is also very helpful. The local councils may be able to assist with what's coming up in your municipality. I've always had the thought that employers can pull the rug out from under employees feet at the drop of a hat. So thats made me work on building skills and opportunities to build income so I'm not totally dependant on a wage. So if you have any entrepreneurial tendancies why not give them a go. What do you like doing, what are you good at, do you need to build new or existing skills. Local community houses have some really good inexpensive courses. Is there anything you could teach. If you are strapped fro cash you could exchange one of your skills and talents for something you want to learn. What can you do now that can generate some fast cash for you and enhance your self esteem. You can type up a very inexpensive flyer and drop in neighbouring letter boxes. You never know you may just have a skill that people want. I guess what I'm saying is there is are opportunities for work if you are willing to think outside the square. Sometimes its important to go out and ask for work, for example my husband is a handyman, and when his work slows down he usually goes to a shopping centre armed with flyers and he has picked up some work. There are other people close by who do the same work but he has got work because he has been willing to go out and ask for it. There are other small opportunities to make money, such as paid market surveys or focus groups, not regular work but still pay some cash. Finally are there some jobs being advertised that you are overlooking and could at least give you some pay and a feeling of purpose even if they arent your ideal job for now.

  • Donno
    Donno
    Posted on:
    23rd Apr 2011 12:27pm

    Donno says: Having been through the same experience, with persistance I finally scored - by trying an area outside my original preferences. If you live in the city areas - go bush, there are many big towns, cities and are well worth a try. Dont over-sell yourself. Be honest, concise and willing to try.
    Hairtail

  • chickclaire
    chickclaire
    Posted on:
    16th Oct 2013 05:48pm

    Donno says: Having been through the same experience, with persistance I finally scored - by trying an area outside my original preferences. If you live in the city areas - go bush, there are many big towns,...

    chickclaire says: I would agree Donno. I am experiencing a far healthier job future by living outside my original preferences. That says it all!

  • Barney
    Barney
    Posted on:
    1st May 2011 09:07am

    Barney says: I have been in a job I don't like for a number of years as I fear I am too old to be employable. At 54 that is sad. Can't afford to retire but I am not enjoying working. After reading all of your comments, I think I will be staying in this stressful job for awhile longer.

  • deb
    deb
    Posted on:
    9th May 2011 01:37pm

    deb says: Sadly I have found exactly the same. I have written to many govt agencies complaining but it is all on deaf ears. I now am trying to get volunteer work and this has even been a struggle for me. You have to submit a CV just to get a look in when trying to get volunteer work these days. I have only had one offer so far for volunteer work apart from a monthly conservation activity, which is doing exactly what I had done six years previously (i.e. reading assistant for primary school). I am not sure how this is going to help me obtain better work prospects when I have just finished ten years of studying. I am seriously depressed these days. I know you have heard this before and you feel like wringing the person's neck when they say "Best of luck" it just sounds soooo... insincere and the feeling of wanting to brush you off quickly. But sincerely I do wish I could say something more encouraging and I do hope things get better for you SINCERELY and HONESTLY so!

    Best regards,

    Debra

  • Tiger Dave
    Tiger Dave
    Posted on:
    16th May 2011 10:22pm

    Tiger Dave says: In 2000 I was working full time and had an accident on the job.I was unable to go back to my pre injury duties that of a driver for one of the big three bread company's.I had been an employer of this company in two periods that totaled 22 years in all.After I did return to work I was given a clerk's job and did this for two years.Then one day the company decided that the job I was doing was no longer required so I was shown the gate.We went to court and I was awarded a small payout and $300 a week less tax and no super paid at all.This was a big drop from what I was earning at the time somewhere between $700 / $800 a week.
    The court award was issued under section 40 of the workers compensation act which ment that to continue to receive it I had to be seeking work.This was in june 2002 and since then I have applied for more jobs then I can remember and because I was in my late 50's it was mission impossible.It is so dissapointing when you send off your CV for jobs that you could do on your ear but because of your age nine out of ten companies don't even have the good grace to reply to your application,and if they do it always sorry but no go.
    In all that time the only work I have been able to get was working as Santa at Christmas,which I did for five years,but have been unable to do so for the last two years.I now work as a School Crossing Supervisor,better known as a Lollypop Man.I am now 65 and would go on the penison but because my wife works full time (Thank God she does or we would be living in a Tent),I can't get it. I hate to think what I have lost in earning over the years and say to anyone out there who is past 50 hold on to your job because it is like flogging a dead horse trying to get a job if you are not working.

  • mysteron347
    mysteron347
    Posted on:
    16th Jun 2011 03:07am

    mysteron347 says: Both tribes of politicians have proclaimed that they want older workers to return to the workforce, they have schemes, people should retire at 67 not 65 and so on.

    It's all hogwash.

    I trained as an electronics technician in the 1970's, soon took an interest in computers and now hold a Computer Science degree. I have 40 years experience in electronics and computing - but I've been unemployed (and unemployable) for the last 10 years.

    Most computer jobs have historically been arranged through agents - a disease that's now affecting many other occupations. When I terminated the contract that I had been working on ten years ago, I was called within 24 hours by an agent - who offered me the position I'd just vacated at $10 less per hour. Hadn't even read the resume - just after the commission.

    After about three years, I was made aware that a skill I had had been put onto the MODL (Migration Occupations Demand List) so I wrote to the Labour minister pointing out that these positions hadn't been advertised in Australia and asking for a list of employers who wanted these services. All I got in return was a wad of paper saying how "these people fit in well with our society." No leads on the employers who allegedly wanted to use the skills described, of course.

    Then there was the scheme to get people over 45 to return to the workforce. Naturally, having an electronics certificate and a Computer Science degree, all I had to do was take a 2-year course to become a security guard. That was the only suggestion the public servant could make.

    The State government offered a course subsidy. The course would explain to me WHY I was unemployed and hence how I could fix the problem. BUT first, I had to take a half-day resume-writing course.

    The resume-writing course really revealed two things - that if you leave dates off of the resume, then employers don't know how old you are. Apparently they're not capable of figuring out that a resume with dates omitted comes from an older person who has been on a resume-writing course. Also, try volunteering.

    Since there was a volunteering office in the building, I went there directly the course had finished and volunteered for a few months. I was getting a whole $8 per day petrol money to defray my costs, which amounted to $25 in petrol and two hours' travel per day.

    After nine months or so, it was obvious that the boss of the workplace where I was volunteering was a user. He'd waste the volunteers' time and was simply on one big ego-trip. Do as the boss said, and "Your efforts are appreciated." Dispute anything he said and "You can always leave - there's a queue of people waiting to take your place."

    Despite being registered with more than 20 recruitment agents,The only other contact I have had was an hour's interview for a company that didn't have the courtesy to say "thanks, but no thanks." I even got a follow-up call from the recruiter chasing commission - because THEY hadn't received a reply either.

    I did land a short-term job, but the boss there was convinced his wife could do a better job. She told him so. Constantly. She had an IT degree. Heaven knows how she got that.

    Since then - well, a 4-hour interview for a job selling electronic components, but not the courtesy of a rejection. The teenager who was appointed has since been replaced - twice....

    To keep liquid, I had to sell a property - and the CGT liability meant that the $3/hr I was getting delivering papers would be taxed at 30+% - and I'm not delivering papers for $2/hr whilst paying tax so the government can subsidise a florist to take an IT course.

    Jobsearch? What a joke. There's so much confusion between Centrelink and DEEWR that neither knows what's happening. They're keen to get you off of their list - and they remove you without notification.

    About a year ago, I went to Centrelink three times to get my Jobsearch number re-activated. The first two times, they couldn't do it - because their computers were down. Now - what's my skill-set again?? Oh - then I had to go for an interview, or they wouldn't reactivate me.

    The "Job Network Provider" at first reckoned I didn't have an appointment, then when shown the piece of paper remarked that I was the third person that week who had the same sort of background, and they don't understand why we can't get jobs. They can't help, of course as I'm not getting any dole so their support is limited to making the newspapers available and using their computers. Well, my computers are better and it would cost me more than the price of a paper to get to their office - as if IT jobs are advertised in the paper anyway.

    After a few months, I was taken off of Jobsearch again, and again went through the series of ineffective reactivations. Finally, I was assigned to the "real good" Job Network Provider.

    This "Job Network Provider" reckoned they can't help, as I'm not getting any dole so their support is limited to making the newspapers available and using their computers. Well, my computers are better and it would cost me more than the price of a paper to get to their office - as if IT jobs are advertised in the paper anyway.

    A further interview was arranged for a magic "13-week" period later - June 2nd, as it happens. Of course, by the time this came around, Centrelink/DEEWR had managed to disable my jobsearch access again. When I arrived for the interview, I was told that it had been cancelled, but I wasn't allowed to know by whom or when, or have notification.

    The standard three Centrelink interviews later, and talking to the DEEWR managers in Canberra and I finally got to talk to the local office manager, who transferred me to yet another Provider.

    This "Job Network Provider" reckoned they can't help, as I'm not getting any dole so their support is limited to making the newspapers available and using their computers. Well, my computers are better and it would cost me more than the price of a paper to get to their office - as if IT jobs are advertised in the paper anyway. (you may have read this before)

    They also wanted to put me through the "13-week" rigmarole, but arranged the follow-up for a week later when I protested I'd just gone through this mandatory delay.

    I'll not bother repeating what they had to say at that interview. I've already posted it three times in this essay. Oh - and two days later, I got a call from them because they wanted to "exit me from the system."

    So - government wanting to help mature-age workers back into the system? Rubbish.

    And IT jobs - hundreds of them! Also rubbish - the agencies make such a huge margin and have such low costs that they only need to place one in 500 and keep a 'stable' of five or six contractors - or permanents that they churn - to cover their salary. They advertise bogus jobs - I've caught them at it - to collect resumes to peddle. All it costs them is to fax off the resumes to their top ten clients - or it's even cheaper to email them. That's all they do.

    This generates the illusion that there are hundreds of jobs available. And agents prefer to make a larger margin on a "new grad" so someone with experience doesn't even get a look-in. The employer is presented with greenhorns but doesn't appear to have the wit to bypass the agencies.

    I can only say what's happening in IT. I'm sure it's happening in other areas, too.

    So what am I supposed to do? Become a check-out er, chap or a nightfill operator or a trolley-jockey? Aren't those kids' jobs - but the kids are all out learning how to be CEOs in a week.

    And government makes no move - just noise. Look no further than KRudd's wife for the reason why - she made her millions being a recruitment agent - a do-nothing job at astronomical salary. And the government collect revenue by licensing the agents....

    And there's something else that I've noticed about all of the people I've encountered in this farcical merry-go-round - all the recruiters, centrelink personnel, DEEWR managers, "Job Network Provider" personnel, course-conductors - the whole lot - but I dare not say what that is...

  • mysteron347
    mysteron347
    Posted on:
    16th Jun 2011 03:10am

    mysteron347 says: Both tribes of politicians have proclaimed that they want older workers to return to the workforce, they have schemes, people should retire at 67 not 65 and so on.

    It's all hogwash.

    I trained as an electronics technician in the 1970's, soon took an interest in computers and now hold a Computer Science degree. I have 40 years experience in electronics and computing - but I've been unemployed (and unemployable) for the last 10 years.

    Most computer jobs have historically been arranged through agents - a disease that's now affecting many other occupations. When I terminated the contract that I had been working on ten years ago, I was called within 24 hours by an agent - who offered me the position I'd just vacated at $10 less per hour. Hadn't even read the resume - just after the commission.

    After about three years, I was made aware that a skill I had had been put onto the MODL (Migration Occupations Demand List) so I wrote to the Labour minister pointing out that these positions hadn't been advertised in Australia and asking for a list of employers who wanted these services. All I got in return was a wad of paper saying how "these people fit in well with our society." No leads on the employers who allegedly wanted to use the skills described, of course.

    Then there was the scheme to get people over 45 to return to the workforce. Naturally, having an electronics certificate and a Computer Science degree, all I had to do was take a 2-year course to become a security guard. That was the only suggestion the public servant could make.

    The State government offered a course subsidy. The course would explain to me WHY I was unemployed and hence how I could fix the problem. BUT first, I had to take a half-day resume-writing course.

    The resume-writing course really revealed two things - that if you leave dates off of the resume, then employers don't know how old you are. Apparently they're not capable of figuring out that a resume with dates omitted comes from an older person who has been on a resume-writing course. Also, try volunteering.

    Since there was a volunteering office in the building, I went there directly the course had finished and volunteered for a few months. I was getting a whole $8 per day petrol money to defray my costs, which amounted to $25 in petrol and two hours' travel per day.

    After nine months or so, it was obvious that the boss of the workplace where I was volunteering was a user. He'd waste the volunteers' time and was simply on one big ego-trip. Do as the boss said, and "Your efforts are appreciated." Dispute anything he said and "You can always leave - there's a queue of people waiting to take your place."

    Despite being registered with more than 20 recruitment agents,The only other contact I have had was an hour's interview for a company that didn't have the courtesy to say "thanks, but no thanks." I even got a follow-up call from the recruiter chasing commission - because THEY hadn't received a reply either.

    I did land a short-term job, but the boss there was convinced his wife could do a better job. She told him so. Constantly. She had an IT degree. Heaven knows how she got that.

    Since then - well, a 4-hour interview for a job selling electronic components, but not the courtesy of a rejection. The teenager who was appointed has since been replaced - twice....

    To keep liquid, I had to sell a property - and the CGT liability meant that the $3/hr I was getting delivering papers would be taxed at 30+% - and I'm not delivering papers for $2/hr whilst paying tax so the government can subsidise a florist to take an IT course.

    Jobsearch? What a joke. There's so much confusion between Centrelink and DEEWR that neither knows what's happening. They're keen to get you off of their list - and they remove you without notification.

    About a year ago, I went to Centrelink three times to get my Jobsearch number re-activated. The first two times, they couldn't do it - because their computers were down. Now - what's my skill-set again?? Oh - then I had to go for an interview, or they wouldn't reactivate me.

    The "Job Network Provider" at first reckoned I didn't have an appointment, then when shown the piece of paper remarked that I was the third person that week who had the same sort of background, and they don't understand why we can't get jobs. They can't help, of course as I'm not getting any dole so their support is limited to making the newspapers available and using their computers. Well, my computers are better and it would cost me more than the price of a paper to get to their office - as if IT jobs are advertised in the paper anyway.

    After a few months, I was taken off of Jobsearch again, and again went through the series of ineffective reactivations. Finally, I was assigned to the "real good" Job Network Provider.

    This "Job Network Provider" reckoned they can't help, as I'm not getting any dole so their support is limited to making the newspapers available and using their computers. Well, my computers are better and it would cost me more than the price of a paper to get to their office - as if IT jobs are advertised in the paper anyway.

    A further interview was arranged for a magic "13-week" period later - June 2nd, as it happens. Of course, by the time this came around, Centrelink/DEEWR had managed to disable my jobsearch access again. When I arrived for the interview, I was told that it had been cancelled, but I wasn't allowed to know by whom or when, or have notification.

    The standard three Centrelink interviews later, and talking to the DEEWR managers in Canberra and I finally got to talk to the local office manager, who transferred me to yet another Provider.

    This "Job Network Provider" reckoned they can't help, as I'm not getting any dole so their support is limited to making the newspapers available and using their computers. Well, my computers are better and it would cost me more than the price of a paper to get to their office - as if IT jobs are advertised in the paper anyway. (you may have read this before)

    They also wanted to put me through the "13-week" rigmarole, but arranged the follow-up for a week later when I protested I'd just gone through this mandatory delay.

    I'll not bother repeating what they had to say at that interview. I've already posted it three times in this essay. Oh - and two days later, I got a call from them because they wanted to "exit me from the system."

    So - government wanting to help mature-age workers back into the system? Rubbish.

    And IT jobs - hundreds of them! Also rubbish - the agencies make such a huge margin and have such low costs that they only need to place one in 500 and keep a 'stable' of five or six contractors - or permanents that they churn - to cover their salary. They advertise bogus jobs - I've caught them at it - to collect resumes to peddle. All it costs them is to fax off the resumes to their top ten clients - or it's even cheaper to email them. That's all they do.

    This generates the illusion that there are hundreds of jobs available. And agents prefer to make a larger margin on a "new grad" so someone with experience doesn't even get a look-in. The employer is presented with greenhorns but doesn't appear to have the wit to bypass the agencies.

    I can only say what's happening in IT. I'm sure it's happening in other areas, too.

    So what am I supposed to do? Become a check-out er, chap or a nightfill operator or a trolley-jockey? Aren't those kids' jobs - but the kids are all out learning how to be CEOs in a week.

    And government makes no move - just noise. Look no further than KRudd's wife for the reason why - she made her millions being a recruitment agent - a do-nothing job at astronomical salary. And the government collect revenue by licensing the agents....

    And there's something else that I've noticed about all of the people I've encountered in this farcical merry-go-round - all the recruiters, centrelink personnel, DEEWR managers, "Job Network Provider" personnel, course-conductors - the whole lot - but I dare not say what that is...

  • mysteron347
    mysteron347
    Posted on:
    17th Jun 2011 05:56pm

    mysteron347 says: Sorry about the double-post. I received an error after the first, so I tried again and received yet another error.

    The standard misquote here is "Houston, we have a problem." (Properly "have had..")

  • roxz64
    roxz64
    Posted on:
    23rd Jun 2011 05:03pm

    roxz64 says: I agree Mysteron
    I had to leave work for medicla reasons which requiresd treatment 3 days per week.It is impossible to exist on the DSP so have tried to find part time employment and have had similar problems with these agencies.
    I previously, in the dim dark past, worked at the CES. There was no requirement to gain placements to get paid so people were treated a lot better.'I know when it changed over to these agences, the staff that transferred stated then these places were rorting the system and they had to have a quota to get paid. So they are not interested in the placements as long as they got applicants.
    Mind you they are just as bad in the treatment of the younger job seekers as well.
    My nephew is 20, has worked in retail and also has good experience, with certificates for welding etc and still cant get a job. He is willing to do anything, even labouring and often picks up casual when he can just to do work.
    It is very distressing and he has even tried the armed forces but due to a knee problem isnt able to enlist. Here is someone who is trying hard and is having the same problem with these agencies and goes through the same deregistration by Centrelink regularly,
    If this young active jobseeker - fit, skilled and willing to work cant get a job what hope is there for us older, slightly medically-challenged but well skilled jobseekers?

  • Deo
    Deo
    Posted on:
    4th Jul 2011 12:36am

    Deo says: Yes, I am one of the young lots out their in search for a job. After graduating I thought I would easily get a job with a Bachelor of Science degree in Construction Manager. I spent over 5 years of full time pursing this degree while being involve in all of the construction clubs, volunteering for non-profit organizations, and working full time.

    I came to New Zealand and thought I would easily land a job. Little did I know that it was much harder than I thought. I can't even get a job interview and I thought because of the Rugby World Cup I would easily get one.

    In the end I might have to settle for something else but I will not stop seeking for that opportunity. Life is more enjoyable when you keep accomplishing things especially if its challenging. Like one of my grocery friends use to say when things went wrong or when he did not care " FK it" and moved on.

  • mermaid
    mermaid
    Posted on:
    18th Aug 2011 12:44pm

    mermaid says: Wow perhaps I've met you somewhere along the way myster your accuracy is spot on. I fully concur with your comments and experienced the same working with long term unemployed and I'm not paid to do so. However, my persistence to make management of centrelink, DEEWA and associated agencies take accountability for their incompetent actions paid off. Each of the very 14 people I worked with over a period of 2 years have now been placed in positions and happily working. I refused to be distracted on placing these very enthusiastic people. Not to say the current economic downturn will see them through the remainder of their careers, it will give them experience to go forward. With respect to agency representation it works this way grads are employed to work with you without any form of life experience their role is to cold call companies and pitch a better story than the agency advertising the role. The more experience you hold in I.T. and the Business the easier it is to fit you to a managerial role with larger commission. The opposite applies if your only experience is a programmer or other I.T. role hence the cheaper it is to place a graduate.

    If you haven't already pitched your resume to companies around your city do so and reach out in employment sectors like Linked In there is a wealth of networks available and word of mouth travels. I hope you find what you are seeking and please know you are not alone with your experience of finding work have you thought of starting your own agency for the very reason mature age workers are deemed unemployable, with your experience it may well be the start of a new career.


  • Ronaldo
    Ronaldo
    Posted on:
    26th Nov 2011 12:19pm

    Ronaldo says: I'm in the same boat. I've almost given up hope. Here'shoping we succeed.

  • chickclaire
    chickclaire
    Posted on:
    16th Oct 2013 05:44pm

    chickclaire says: I got into a conversation recently with a mature age job seeker. At her age 62 yrs and my age 38 yrs we found we had applied to the same employer but neither of us were taking the job. Her advice about being polite when applying for work was invaluable. Hopefully you will be able to share some of your advice with us online

  • mysteron347
    mysteron347
    Posted on:
    19th Jan 2014 05:23pm

    mysteron347 says: Update, since this thread has suddenly bobbed up after being created 3 years ago.

    Now been unemployed 12.5 years. Not even bothering to look any more. Fat waste of time studying for all those years.

    Yet still the government is issuing 457 visas hand-over-fist to nominally-qualified candidates because the recruitment agents "can't find" loals to do the job (at the slave-rates on offer)

  • s
    s
    Posted on:
    2nd Mar 2014 05:09pm

    s says: I looked for work in 2011, till June 2012. Then took up and finished Cert 3 in Library. Then became a fulltime student again in 2013. And I will be finishing my diploma partime this semester while I look for work.
    No luck so far had one job interview for positions with the store Target in the Sydney metro area. Out of 45 applications so far this year!!!!
    I have a degree and also a cert 3 in Library and also years of experience in retail where does it get you no where but I will never give up as I am 51 you have tobe persistant.

  • Page 1 of 1
Create a new topic to discuss