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Am i being unfair?

With most charity collectors getting paid a hefty "wage", where is the money really going? Which charities actually give all the money to the people they are collecting for?

Last reply: 23rd Jun 2012 / 130 replies / Post by Goulah

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solstice

Posted by: solstice
Posted: 15th Jun 2009

solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience. Reply

baggage

Posted by: baggage
Posted: 24th Jun 2011

Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

baggage says: this is not a concern of what people are doing around corner, main issue is to help those in need, appreciate low cost prices in charity shops, this might keep a baby worn, or work pants for men, cardigan for you mum. I strongly oppose your comments and who cares what people do? Reply

Ceci

Posted by: Ceci
Posted: 23rd Jun 2012

baggage says: this is not a concern of what people are doing around corner, main issue is to help those in need, appreciate low cost prices in charity shops, this might keep a baby worn, or work pants for men,...

Ceci says: Probably it is not a struggle for you to donate, but for the rest of us it is. So why all my effort should go to some warm, well dressed two hour "worker" while the real people in need are left with barely nothing. There's gotta be another way to donate without being abused, which actually defeats the purpose of the donation itself. Reply

Oliveface

Posted by: Oliveface
Posted: 12th Feb 2012

Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

Oliveface says: One of our human weakness is to judge others by what they do and what you see. Who knows what these executives are doing - attending meetings and going from one place to another - they need a reliable car to travel. Reply

EileenW1

Posted by: EileenW1
Posted: 18th Feb 2012

Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

EileenW1 says: That doesn't mean all charities are like this. For more than 20 years I raised money through my school for UNICEF where I could see that 95% of money raised gets to those children and mothers in need during World crises. UNICEF asks where you want the money to be spent, send you the results, provides annual report on its spending, accounting and the wages paid to just a small few who are required for clerical, legal and administration purposes. Almost everyone else is an unpaid volunteer. Reply

Rachel

Posted by: Rachel
Posted: 29th Apr 2011

solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

Rachel says: No this is true but a lot of them do employ cheap labour (on commission basis)
and program them to market a speech specially designed to get you to donate even after you have said NO! Reply

baggage

Posted by: baggage
Posted: 24th Jun 2011

solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

baggage says: I agree with yourself solstice, being a single mum I visit a lot of charity organisations, people work there don't get paid mega dollars, Until you really have a changing experience in your life, these organisations are a true blessing. As I always say never judge a book by its cover, as you never know what's around the corner! Reply

meow

Posted by: meow
Posted: 11th Dec 2009

meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all volunteer based in my area, so maybe thats the way to go? Reply

Anzacbaby

Posted by: Anzacbaby
Posted: 16th Dec 2009

meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all...

Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of me.
This may be because our family have received some very generous, and much needed support from some charities (Variety Club, Lions Club and Local Rotary) when our (now deceased daughter) required expensive equipment which wasn't funded.
For the same reason we support the RCH Good Friday Appeal also.
I think it is important to give whatever you can to help others less fortunate. Reply

niecie

Posted by: niecie
Posted: 17th Dec 2009

Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I do not support overseas charitiies as I believe that too much of the money is used for the wrong purposes. Reply

Jen

Posted by: Jen
Posted: 13th May 2010

niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I...

Jen says: I recently heard about Angel Flight, which I initially thought was only for children. But it is entirely funded by donations from the public to assist those in remote areas to get to medical treatment in cities or larger base hospitals.

I live hundreds of klm away from any metro area and my husband needs to access medical care on an ongoing basis. Angel Flight is there with pilots who volunteer their time, their planes and their own resourses to make these trips available to all who need them.

If you want to donate to something worthwhile, this is one charity that is making a huge difference to people's lives here in remote parts of Australia and even in not so remote areas where there is no spcialist services available.

There are "Ground Angels" too, ones who will meet the plane and take the person and their carer to their appointment or hospital.

What wonderful people!
They only have small overheads too, operating out of an office in Brisbane, so the money you donate goes to where it is needed.

Tell your friends! Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

Jen says: I recently heard about Angel Flight, which I initially thought was only for children. But it is entirely funded by donations from the public to assist those in remote areas to get to medical...

Goulah says: Quite often at work I collect money for charity (when we have our casual Fridays) and I was horrified when so few knew about the RFDS and similar organisations. To try and overcome that particular problem I put posters up in the tea room to highlight the work done by them. Reply

Kessa

Posted by: Kessa
Posted: 18th Feb 2012

Jen says: I recently heard about Angel Flight, which I initially thought was only for children. But it is entirely funded by donations from the public to assist those in remote areas to get to medical...

Kessa says: Yes, Angel Flight is one I support as I know how difficult it can be for people who are isolated on properties in remote areas of Australia. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I...

Goulah says: For some reason I have always found that the RFDS is one of my favourites. Not sure if it is because of the sterling work they do under such harsh conditions or for their pioneering spirit. Reply

Elle

Posted by: Elle
Posted: 8th Nov 2010

Goulah says: For some reason I have always found that the RFDS is one of my favourites. Not sure if it is because of the sterling work they do under such harsh conditions or for their pioneering spirit.

Elle says: I agree with donating to the RFDS. Another very worthwhile one is the Seeing eye Dog charity, as is the animal refuge and RSPCA> These are all our own charities, and ones which serve those who cannot help themselves. These days of financial crisis makes it hard for pensioners to select those they'd love to donate to if they had sufficient funds, so it is a good idea to rotate them as one can.
Elle Reply

Ollie

Posted by: Ollie
Posted: 16th Nov 2010

Elle says: I agree with donating to the RFDS. Another very worthwhile one is the Seeing eye Dog charity, as is the animal refuge and RSPCA> These are all our own charities, and ones which serve those who...

Ollie says: Your choices Elle are similar to mine. Guide Dogs; Red Cross; RCH; RSPCA & Cancer Research. Since traveling in the outback, I noted local (often very small) communities, volunteering their time and energy to continually raise funds for RFDS, so I have added that too. Local disasters also benefit from time to time (bushfires/ floods/ cyclones etc)
I agree with others who have mentioned 'local' and genuine, for once I gave to some international animal welfare group (the specific title escapes me) , then EVERY MONTH from then on they sent much paraphenalia, which in the end must have cost more then what I donated. I was so furious, that I NEVER gave another thing. I understand that some advertising is necessary, but to so constantly overload and harrass, a person who had given what they could, was just total waste, waste, waste. ..
This went on for about 2years, after which I actually moved addresses (not for that reason) but I often imagine they are still sending their stuff.
Those address labels annoy me too, for it is not asked for, does cost something to produce, and once I receive them, I say thank you, recycle the rest of the paper and give NOTHING, as all I see is a waste of precious donations.
There are some very reputable charities, just a pity that the shonky ones tend to degrade their reputation. Reply

curleyross

Posted by: curleyross
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

Ollie says: Your choices Elle are similar to mine. Guide Dogs; Red Cross; RCH; RSPCA & Cancer Research. Since traveling in the outback, I noted local (often very small) communities, volunteering their time...

curleyross says: Yes, i agree. I think Charity worker should set the benchmark and have a modest office and salary but demonstrate that all monies riased go directly to their cause in the community. Reply

EileenW1

Posted by: EileenW1
Posted: 18th Feb 2012

niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I...

EileenW1 says: I have started my own little charity in response to the need I saw in villages in eastern Bali. I am a pensioner and yet I hold fundraising barbecues, golf days, concerts, raffles etc as my heart broke when I discovered that children cannot go to school unless parents can pay and so many teenagers were unable to get jobs because they had no schooling. These people had nothing but welcomed me, shared their meagre food and wanted to show me the beauty of their little island which is suppressed and suffering under Indonesia's yoke.
I collect clothing, football boots, uniforms and money over to my villages and decide who gets what. I have within four years, furnished two classrooms, provided school uniforms for two year groups, got five soccer teams playing in a league, paid schooling for two children until they leave and donated food and clothing to so many beautiful, grateful people. Yes there are great needs here in Australia too but we must act where our hearts respond and not say one need is greater than another. For years I worked to raise money for UNICEF where 95% of the donations go to children in crisis throughout the world. The worst thing is to do nothing! Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

Goulah says: Yes it can be very hard to decide to donate to one over the other. There are so many truly worthy causes. Reply

desi

Posted by: desi
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

desi says: i agree without the children's and the suport of those groups my son would have lost his hand as it is now he has full use and can lead a happy life Reply

Anzacbaby

Posted by: Anzacbaby
Posted: 20th Nov 2010

Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

Anzacbaby says: Reply

baggage

Posted by: baggage
Posted: 24th Jun 2011

Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

baggage says: I agree every little bit helps and there is always someone needing something, or a child not well, someone sleeping outside in the cold. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all...

Goulah says: I do tend to prefer the smaller charities - and the ones which get out and help the needy (be it animals or humans). Reply

bj

Posted by: bj
Posted: 15th Dec 2010

meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all...

bj says: Me too, thats where I help, little local ones. Items stay in community where we are and are needed. Reply

mumza58

Posted by: mumza58
Posted: 20th Dec 2010

meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all...

mumza58 says: I agree with you, I give to my local area by donating money, goods or my time. This way I can see what happens to my donations. I feel that the bigger the charity the bigger the overhead. We should be told how much of our doller is passed on and what is kept for overhead. Reply

libbyanne

Posted by: libbyanne
Posted: 17th Dec 2009

libbyanne says: I must admit I am extremely skeptical about donating to charities because you don't know where it is going and how much of it actually gets to the people who need it. If I knew all of what I donated went directly to the reason the fund was set up, then I would donate to them. But as it is, I haven't donated for years because it just seems like you put your money in a tin and you don't know if much of it actually gets to where it should. Reply

Claude

Posted by: Claude
Posted: 17th Dec 2009

libbyanne says: I must admit I am extremely skeptical about donating to charities because you don't know where it is going and how much of it actually gets to the people who need it. If I knew all of what I...

Claude says: I have often wondered if the money really goes where it is supposed to but if everyone felt this way there would be no support at all. I just have to trust that they are honest and above board. Reply

keith

Posted by: keith
Posted: 21st Dec 2009

Claude says: I have often wondered if the money really goes where it is supposed to but if everyone felt this way there would be no support at all. I just have to trust that they are honest and above board.

keith says: You have got to accept that all charities, like other businesses, have overheads. The problem is that they are not required to publish accounts showing how much (in actual dollars or as a % of funds raised) actually trickled down to the objects of their charity. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

keith says: You have got to accept that all charities, like other businesses, have overheads. The problem is that they are not required to publish accounts showing how much (in actual dollars or as a % of...

Goulah says: By the very nature of the word charity it should not be a business but an organisation which collects money in a businesslike way without the wage. Perhaps I am an optimist. Reply

Laughaminute

Posted by: Laughaminute
Posted: 17th May 2011

keith says: You have got to accept that all charities, like other businesses, have overheads. The problem is that they are not required to publish accounts showing how much (in actual dollars or as a % of...

Laughaminute says: Sorry, Keith, you somethings incorrect. Charities do have to show their books which include income and outgoing funds. Like any other business, they are audited and MUST be held accountable for every cent spent. If there is anything that does not "add up"" in their books, the treasurer and others could be in huge trouble. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

Claude says: I have often wondered if the money really goes where it is supposed to but if everyone felt this way there would be no support at all. I just have to trust that they are honest and above board.

Goulah says: I am that way too. Some days I tend to trust them and other times "forget it". Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

libbyanne says: I must admit I am extremely skeptical about donating to charities because you don't know where it is going and how much of it actually gets to the people who need it. If I knew all of what I...

Goulah says: I would love it if there was a list somewhere which gave factual data as to exactly how much went where and how much the administrators got. Reply

Stekel

Posted by: Stekel
Posted: 1st Mar 2010

Stekel says: Several years ago ( some 30 )I paid $ 5.00 to the blind dogs charity drive, four weeks after I gave this donation I was watching the ABC and they interviewed one of the people from the Blind dogs, they asked him how much was collected , "he said $ 6 Million" ( if I remember correctly ) than he asked," how much did the blind dogs receive" after a fair bit of prompting he answerd " half a Million " that was the last time I paid in to charities! Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

Stekel says: Several years ago ( some 30 )I paid $ 5.00 to the blind dogs charity drive, four weeks after I gave this donation I was watching the ABC and they interviewed one of the people from the Blind dogs,...

Goulah says: Ouch. That is not exactly making me feel warm and fuzzy. Perhaps I am the one with blinkers on. Reply

beetee

Posted by: beetee
Posted: 30th Mar 2010

beetee says: No, you are not being unfair, but.......firstly, not all charities are created equal. I reckon we would all agree that some are better than others. Some people who work for charitable organisations would obviously feel that they are really doing some good in what they do, whilst for others perhaps it's just a job - but either way, those employees need to earn a living just like you and I, so as long as it is a fair wage for a fair day's work, it is difficult to question that side of things. i believe charities are required by law to make available their financial info. so i think it would be fairly easy find out how much, on a percentage basis, is spent on overheads. Some people choose to donate a dedicated amount to just one or two charities, whilst I know some who have decided that they give a small amount, say $2-$10 to every charity that asks of them, whilst others pick and choose when requested and then usually give an amount of, say $2, then of course some give none - perhaps because they cannot afford it and others, because they choose not to. Ultimately though i guess giving away your own hard earned money to 'someone else' is always a big decision, but I think if it's something you wanna do then the information is there if you seek it. Here is something I heard recently and it really struck a chord.... (not verbatim, but as I remember it) "They say that charity begins at home....and it does, but that doesn't mean that's where it should end!" . sorry about the long post, but I have found from personal experience that the people I know who complain the most about charities, or money being sent overseas and not support 'our own', are the people who give the least, or indeed nothing at all. That is their choice of course, but it is sad to hear people 'beating' up on all charities when you know that really it wouldn't matter what some organisation did, some people would never part with their cash. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

beetee says: No, you are not being unfair, but.......firstly, not all charities are created equal. I reckon we would all agree that some are better than others. Some people who work for charitable...

Goulah says: It is hard not to be cynical. It occurred to me recently that over 50% of the mail I get at home is from various charities and pseudo charities asking me for a donation. Reply

beetee

Posted by: beetee
Posted: 28th Jul 2010

Goulah says: It is hard not to be cynical. It occurred to me recently that over 50% of the mail I get at home is from various charities and pseudo charities asking me for a donation.

beetee says: Yeah, I can see where cynism comes from - I get the mail too...and the phone calls and the street collecting etc. Even the organisations I support constantly send mail asking for more. But I guess the reality is we live in a first world country where, for most of us, our first priority is ourselves! It does your heart good to give .... it doesn't have to be money of course, but for most that is the easiest way to give-especially if our time or energy is in short supply. The other truth is that there are soooooo many charities out there. I always think that where you have organisations doing essentially the same work that it's a shame they can't hook up and work together - surely that would cut down on those nasty overheads and admin costs. and leave more money for those in need. One of the best programs I have heard of recently is one where they actually LOAN funds to people in the third world to start businesses etc. These people then go on to employ others and are no longer dependent on others. This is a win/win as they feel empowered and themselves go on to help and support others. (sorry --another long post, I am not a person of few words, LOL!) Reply

sylvester

Posted by: sylvester
Posted: 11th Apr 2010

sylvester says: According to the Adelaide newspaper a cancer charity in SA was passing on just 2c in every dollar to where it was supposed to go. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

sylvester says: According to the Adelaide newspaper a cancer charity in SA was passing on just 2c in every dollar to where it was supposed to go.

Goulah says: Not to mention that street collectors also get most of the money too. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

Goulah says: Not to mention that street collectors also get most of the money too.

sherri says: no they don't! That is an urban myth. There is an awful lot going on in the area of charity and charity work that I do NOT agree with and would love to do something to change. -But this is not one of them.

For the most part your native urban tin-rattler is a pensioner or a school-kid neither of whom receive a cent and often a lot of abuse for their trouble. Reply

phinnie

Posted by: phinnie
Posted: 12th Apr 2010

phinnie says: Before i give to any charity, I contact it and ask for the figures to show what percentage of the donated dollar ACTUALLY makes it to its destination. If they do not know or will not tell me, then they get crossed off the list.

Of the ones that do - and many can and do - I donate where it is most effective in the area which I wish to support. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

phinnie says: Before i give to any charity, I contact it and ask for the figures to show what percentage of the donated dollar ACTUALLY makes it to its destination. If they do not know or will not tell me, then...

Goulah says: I am being lazy by saying this but I would love it if someone else put up a list of various charities and their actual donations. My money giving is certainly done on a whim (animals before humans or Australians before overseas people). Reply

jgb

Posted by: jgb
Posted: 13th Apr 2010

jgb says: I NEVER give to big charities like world vision because of the fact that they pay huge salaries and are starting to preach politics, much of which I do not agree with.
I do give often to where there is a need and one of these is a place called teen challenge, an organization that helps drug addicts rehabilitate and they have a 90% success rate. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

jgb says: I NEVER give to big charities like world vision because of the fact that they pay huge salaries and are starting to preach politics, much of which I do not agree with.
I do give often to where...

Goulah says: With my collecting for charity via work I Googled a list of Australian charities. There were so many I culled the list to only Victorian charities and then to Melbourne charities. Needless to say it was a pointless exercise because they were all so needy and I could not choose. Reply

mogg1966

Posted by: mogg1966
Posted: 29th Apr 2010

mogg1966 says: There are so many worthwhile charities I usually choose a charity close to my heart, the cancer council (may passed away from cancer) or RSPCA, they do so much for our furry/feathered/scaly friends who cannot say they are hurt or in pain. If I cannot give $$ I offer to help in other ways, I volunteer for a non-for-profit organisation, this keeps me busy and also I give back to my local community :) Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

mogg1966 says: There are so many worthwhile charities I usually choose a charity close to my heart, the cancer council (may passed away from cancer) or RSPCA, they do so much for our furry/feathered/scaly friends...

Goulah says: I tend to go for Royal Women's Hospital one month, then a doggy equivalent the next. The third month it is cancer, then Lost Dogs etc. Truth be told the doggy ones tend to get the most. Reply

redhead

Posted by: redhead
Posted: 3rd May 2010

redhead says: There are a few charities that give 95% but they are rare and as you say there are a lot out ther that get a hefty cut out of donations you only have to look at our recent fires in Victoria councils have scored money but the people it was for have hardly got anything or any benefit from it. In fact they are paying more charges from greedy councils so to give money pick carefully. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

redhead says: There are a few charities that give 95% but they are rare and as you say there are a lot out ther that get a hefty cut out of donations you only have to look at our recent fires in Victoria...

Goulah says: I am not a religious person but tend to find that church groups (or their equivalent) are more "honest" with their distribution. Reply

arokh72

Posted by: arokh72
Posted: 4th May 2010

arokh72 says: I'd love to know where these huge wages are. I work for a major Australian not for profit organisation and don't get a hefty wage. In fact I'm only earning about $19/hr as a casual worker (not collector). Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

arokh72 says: I'd love to know where these huge wages are. I work for a major Australian not for profit organisation and don't get a hefty wage. In fact I'm only earning about $19/hr as a casual worker (not...

Goulah says: I am working on the basis that there is quite a difference between "not for profit" and "charity". Not for profit puts a lot more back to the community. Reply

turkeyknees

Posted by: turkeyknees
Posted: 14th May 2010

turkeyknees says: my uncle used to collect for a charity years ago.he was paid a percentage of what he collected.which to me is ridiculous as i believe donating to a charity should be just that all money goes to the charity and not to the collectors.
however the charity i support is the animal welfare league,i do this by taking cans of pet food and bags of dry food down to the shelter for the cats and dogs there. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

turkeyknees says: my uncle used to collect for a charity years ago.he was paid a percentage of what he collected.which to me is ridiculous as i believe donating to a charity should be just that all money goes to...

Goulah says: I thoroughly endorse your sentiments. Reply

turkeyknees

Posted by: turkeyknees
Posted: 14th May 2010

turkeyknees says: what i do now is ask to see the charity direct card from anyone who comes collecting Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

turkeyknees says: what i do now is ask to see the charity direct card from anyone who comes collecting

Goulah says: Would you please describe what is a "charity direct" card is? Reply

turkeyknees

Posted by: turkeyknees
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

Goulah says: Would you please describe what is a "charity direct" card is?

turkeyknees says: i ask for an id card which has charity direct written on it and also the logo.it has the charity and sometimes the collectors name.if the collector cant produce some sort of photo id of themselves and then from the charity i hand nothing over.i only support the animal welfare league ,the rspca,guide dogs and stuff that i have seen evidence myself of that they are grateful for. it concerns me that you read about so many dishonest people these days who rip innocent people off and who get away with it as it gives the people and companies,organisations who are above aboard and worthy of our trust a dark cloud you could say hanging over them Reply

Joan

Posted by: Joan
Posted: 26th May 2010

Joan says: I am a member of a Lions Club and I have been Treasurer for several years. I can assure you that in NSW and presumably the other states in Australia there are quite strict regulations (administered by the Office of Fair Trading and the Office of Liquor Gaming and Racing) which cover charitable fundraising and how much must be returned to the community in the form of donations/support. For example, at least 60% of gross proceeds from a raffle must go to the advertised project. Check out http://www.olgr.nsw.gov.au/charitable_best_pract.asp if you want to investigate further. It also covers issues like using paid collectors (who must be clearly identified as such).
In the case of Lions Clubs we follow the general principle that all money raised from the public must go back to the public, with the only deductions being the direct costs of the fundraising activity. For example in the case of a raffle we can deduct the cost of the prizes, the tickets, any advertising and postage etc. But those amounts cannot exceed 40% of the total as per the above guidelines. The general administration costs of running a club are paid for by members out of their own pockets through membership fees.
I would challenge your assertion that "most charity collectors [are] paid a hefty wage". I think you'll find the majority are volunteers who belong to community service organisations. May I respectfully suggest that if you have a problem with donating your cash, donate your time and energy instead. It's incredibly rewarding to be part of an organisation which does amazing things both locally and throughout the world. Check out the websites of Lions and Rotary to see the sorts of things they do. Or choose another charity and support that - there are so many, and they need volunteers as much or more than they need cash. And don't say you're too busy - make the time. Go on - I dare you!! You won't be sorry. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

Joan says: I am a member of a Lions Club and I have been Treasurer for several years. I can assure you that in NSW and presumably the other states in Australia there are quite strict regulations...

Goulah says: Lions is a totally different ball game. They are not under my loose heading of charity as their charter and their behaviours follow what should be - and is - done to get monies to those who need it. Members do not enter into the collection aspect to make money for themselves.

I have spent many a happy day or two helping out at Lions events (and other similar organisations), donate 1% of my annual salary and try to help out in practicable ways.

Thank you though Joan for your suggestions. Reply

turkeyknees

Posted by: turkeyknees
Posted: 27th Jul 2010

turkeyknees says: i also have found the lions club to be one of the charities you can trust. the lions club helped me big time years ago when i needed help and had a real struggle on my hands. i never asked for their help and at the time was so embarrassed to have help.somebody who knew the situation told the lions club. Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 28th Jul 2010

turkeyknees says: i also have found the lions club to be one of the charities you can trust. the lions club helped me big time years ago when i needed help and had a real struggle on my hands. i never asked for...

Goulah says: It is lovely to hear that someone put Lions in touch with you to help out and that all worked out well. Reply

Joan

Posted by: Joan
Posted: 28th Jul 2010

Joan says: Thanks for your positive comments about Lions. It's amazing how many people will give us a few dollars or buy our raffle tickets or whatever purely because we're Lions and they know we do good things, without knowing the specifics. There are too many projects to mention here - check out their website.

Further to the issue of accountability of charities, in NSW the Office of Liquor Gaming & Racing and the Office of Fair Tradiing administer the rules governing charities. We have to report annually to Fair Trading supplying figures for how much money we raised from the public and how much of that was donated back to the community (has to be at least 40%, or your status as a charity is at risk). The OLGR has a publication "Best Practice Guidelines for Charitable Organisations" which covers all aspects of charity fundraising, including using paid collectors. It's very comprehensive. I'm sure other states will have similar resources.

Some of the less "sexy" charities feel compelled to use paid collectors as they don't have a broad volunteer base, and getting 20c (or even 5c) in the dollar is better than nothing at all. In NSW paid collectors have to wear ID badges which state clearly who they're collecting for, and that the collector is being paid (but not how much).

Sorry, I've rabbitted on again. It's been very interesting to read people's opinions. There are so many great charities out there - keep on giving! Reply

Katiebear35

Posted by: Katiebear35
Posted: 10th Nov 2010

Katiebear35 says: If you want to donate to a charity and know 100% of your money is going to the cause, donate through your local Rotary/ Rotaract club. By being a part of this organisation we have nearly erdicated polio from the world and polio only 1%of polio exists in the world today. It was heartbreaking with the Bushfire appeal last year to see how much money organisations like the Red Cross were keeping for themselves. Whereas, whatever was donated through Rotary to the Bushfire Appeal, 100% went to the Bushfire Appeal and we supported the affected with Shelterboxes which provide all the necessarities for families but do not come cheap. One shelterbox costs $1,200. There are used around the world and are currently being deployed in Indonesia in the volcano and tsunami affected areas. Reply

richard

Posted by: richard
Posted: 16th Nov 2010

richard says: And don't forget. what goes around, comes around. We all have a duty t support those left fortunate. Has anyone ever thought how hard it must be for some to have to go and ask for 'charity'? I would think that it would be quite soul destroying. Reply

Rainbow

Posted by: Rainbow
Posted: 16th Nov 2010

Rainbow says: I run a charity which helps out the underpriveledged with food parcels, clothing, counselling and metoring. I actually don't draw any money from it and in fact I pour hundreds and hundreds of my own money into it and have the occassional donation that helps of food, clothing or cash. At one stage I was working another job just to fund the needs of the poor. I have no administration costs that the charity pays for, bar 1 mobile phone which is the lifeline for those in need to call.... All our services are free and the only fundraising we do is the occassional BBQ in a public place.
Not all charities are pulling in big dollars nor are all charites do the wrong thing with their funds. You just research them carefully andpick and choose what you donate to. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

Rainbow says: I run a charity which helps out the underpriveledged with food parcels, clothing, counselling and metoring. I actually don't draw any money from it and in fact I pour hundreds and hundreds of my...

sherri says: Yes Rainbow - but that is just the problem.

Having worked in the area myself I know that not all orgs live up to their reputations, and that there are some that have forgotten their roots. And there are some that do amazing work despite incredible difficulties.

And then there is the other side of the coin, and sometimes agencies will say 'no' to clients for good and valid reason....but of course the client does not see it that way.

It is REALLY difficult to sort it all out and work out where to give so that the $ gets the best 'bang for it's buck' - and this is from someone with 'inside information'.

Let's just say that there it is a good idea to check out as far as possible where your money is going, ...and that there are some organisations - even well known organisations I WILL NEVER SUPPORT -( but even these do SOME good work! )

And sadly, over all I have to restate that overall I don't like the way that the not -for profit/welfare/charity sector is heading...and that the practices of these organisations turns people off donating. And that makes me angry considering all that is needed to be done. Reply

maggie

Posted by: maggie
Posted: 16th Nov 2010

maggie says: I would love to know the answer to this , are there really any that use all money collected for Charity. Reply

Peefer

Posted by: Peefer
Posted: 16th Nov 2010

Peefer says: The Fred Hollows Foundation works in Australia and many other countries, manufacturing cheap intra-ocular lenses and saving the sight of thousands of people. I understand their overheads are about 7% of their income which is pretty low. Reply

booie

Posted by: booie
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

booie says: One of the biggest problems faced by charities is the raising of funds if they are not government supported.
If you only have volunteers collecting money for you then your supply of funds will almost certainly be limited, if on the other hand you have professional charity collectors the organisation would expect to have more funds available.
The big question is " Are charities really better off with the professional fund raisers."
I personally prefer to give to those charities that rely on volunteers but do all the funds either way go where they are supposed to go. Reply

Panthera

Posted by: Panthera
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

Panthera says: As a Commonweath tax auditor many years ago, I vividly remember auditing one of these so-called street corner charity collection businesses for a local flora/fauna charity. Total collections was just over $14,000. After the inflated fallacious expenses, wages, commissions and even rent and car payments the charity ended up receiving about $28.00. So..the money we donate in good will quite often never gets to the charities who it is intended for. I no longer donate to street corner charities. Reply

sylvia

Posted by: sylvia
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

sylvia says: I always wonder how much of what I and others donate actually goes to the poor and needy themselves and how much to the directors. I'd hate to think that people are donating and the money is actually making some director of a charity rich (if that is the case they should be ashamed of themselves and they should be named and shamed on national television and made to repay the money back to charity). Reply

Cool

Posted by: Cool
Posted: 1st Dec 2010

sylvia says: I always wonder how much of what I and others donate actually goes to the poor and needy themselves and how much to the directors. I'd hate to think that people are donating and the money is...

Cool says: I think Charity Directors should be well enough paid in their regular job to deny themselves the support of the Charity they Direct. Leadership from the Top is why some of these "Charities" feel it is OK to Expense the Charity to the Poverty Line.
I think all of us reading and sharing here are in the top 1% of the worlds wealthy and we need to think of the consequences of our financial mentality, We can't save the world on our own but we can do our bit. Shaming Sham Directors is worth consideration but the Charity should not suffer rather the Criminal (Director) should be exposed for who they are. (This does not apply to the save the Evil Directors Charity :-) ) Reply

WitchyMage

Posted by: WitchyMage
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

WitchyMage says: Until I read this, I never knew collectors got paid.

I'm a volunteer and I always assumed that all collectors are volunteers as well. I sure the large majority of collectors are volunteers who aren't paid and are doing it from kindness and generosity so I don't believe we should stop donating.

Most charities don't give "all" money to the cause as they do need money to buy the collecting tins, stickers, flyers, advertisements, etc. but hopefully most have 100% of proceeds go to the cause. Reply

pep

Posted by: pep
Posted: 17th Nov 2010

pep says: I have looked into this question quite in detail and no there is not one that I have researched yet in the last 3 years that give 100% of our money to the ones we are giving it to.Actually most dont even receive 50% of the money.Even the national phone charities with all their special guests on the TV giving their time for nothing dont even get 50%, the management get paid outrageous amounts instead. Did everyone know that the other issue I have is that they dont raise funds to cure deseases , just find treatments for them as that would do them out of a job,and those that need transplants of any kind have to have a healthy body as they dont want bad results because that effects the amount of income they get donated. Reply

Joydy

Posted by: Joydy
Posted: 18th Nov 2010

Joydy says: It's better to donate your time - I volunteer at a local school - working with kids that have trouble reading etc - gives me great satisfaction to help - and makes them more employable when they leave school. Lots of kids don't have any motavation to study the more we can help the better society will be!!!!!
Only cost is time and petrol to get there! Reply

maxi

Posted by: maxi
Posted: 23rd Nov 2010

maxi says: as far a i know the salvation army recieve all the money they are given Reply

maxi

Posted by: maxi
Posted: 23rd Nov 2010

maxi says: as far a i know the salvation army recieve all the money they are given Reply

Cool

Posted by: Cool
Posted: 1st Dec 2010

Cool says: I'd like to see your evidence of the wages these Charity workers draw, Having been involved in the Voluntary side of Charity work I have seen some nice Cars rock up to the Office to discover some other Volunteer (A well off Business Person) giving freely of their time and substance to further the work of the Charity. Sometimes things are not what they seem. I remember in NZ some Businesses supported Charity work on the Side and their books were open to public Scrutiny, others that cheated were found out. People regularly checked up on them... There are cost to running a Charity and while the Governments try to be generous they still impose a lot of requirements. Some Charities just don't have access to free accountants and these services are usually sourced at less than cost. Groups like the Salvation Army endevour to help those not covered by the Government when problems arise and they do a great job getting volunteers into the front line to help the needy. If you have the resource to share and commit it to delivering help to the needy then you are doing a good thing... Reply

truddles

Posted by: truddles
Posted: 6th Dec 2010

truddles says: I too wonder where the money is really going Reply

pinky

Posted by: pinky
Posted: 6th Dec 2010

pinky says: yes i agree where is the money going should be a rule against it especialy door knockersripping of people so sad to see Reply

nene

Posted by: nene
Posted: 10th Dec 2010

nene says: I ma very suspicious about how much actually goes to the needy. At lost of the $ goes to the so called admin costs. Reply

H

Posted by: H
Posted: 16th Dec 2010

H says: I work for a community fund, which of course is a charity.

Drive a 1994 model car and get a very average wage.

Charities HAVE to pay someone or they wouldn't be there to help the community.

In our case a very small portion is paid in wages and the rest is used to support the community.

We are very open about the percentages we allocate to the different areas.

I agree some get paid to much, but most of us a there because we have a passion and want to be able to help

AND the money paid in wages is sourced from other areas. NOT from donations from the public. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

H says: I work for a community fund, which of course is a charity.

Drive a 1994 model car and get a very average wage.

Charities HAVE to pay someone or they wouldn't be there to help the...

sherri says: Yes, and that is the way that it should be - nice sensible balance - but sadly that is not the trend. When I worked in the sector it was because I believed in what I was doing. I needed to be paid or I could not do it at all, but there were many hours that I put in willingly for which I was not paid.

I lasted many years in this industry known for it's high burnout rate and levels of stress. And it never felt like work!

Then we had a change of CEO and subsequent 'corporatisation' - instead of being there for the 'cause' our focus was changed to raising money (in order to support the cause) .... and the rest, as they say is 'history'. Reply

margw

Posted by: margw
Posted: 17th Dec 2010

margw says: I have been giving a monthly donation for at least 6 years to Medicins Sans Frontieres (doctors without borders) They send me a yearly statement (and thank-you) on how my donation is spent, i.e 100 vaccinations, 50 blankets etc.
Any charity should be able to send you a statement on what goes where and their admin costs.
In the end, no matter want charity you give to, and where your money really goes to, remember, you are giving from your heart, and it is the thought that you are giving is what counts - and it makes you feel good! Reply

Natacha

Posted by: Natacha
Posted: 20th Dec 2010

Natacha says: I read that Oxfam distribute their funds very fairly, but any pamphlet they produce is probably going to say that anyway. There was a pie chart designating nearly 80% of the funding to the people that needed it.
I was wondering about WSPA Australia myself, because I support them. I'm also a soft touch for money tins, and I'll be supporting Doctors Without Borders next year. Who knows, once I become a nurse, I may actually join them!
I know people make the legitimate complaint that people need help too and that we shouldn't value animals over people, but I think most people who support animal interests also care a lot about human interests. It's why I don't support PETA because I'm not sure if a lot of their methods and ideas are well-thought out- such as the protest against tail clipping, a process that actually protects sheep from flies. And while I like the idea of a chilled meat trade instead of a live trade, I think there should be a method to protect the farmers from lost profit.
Reply

Multismudge

Posted by: Multismudge
Posted: 30th Jan 2011

Multismudge says: I only contribute to Charities if "I feel the money is going to where they say"
Most of the BIG charites have over-heads that are costing the actual donation and giving a very small % to where we think it is going.
I, Myself and Me will only donate every now and then. I am on an allowance and $ do not go that far.
Royal Flying Doctors, Doctors without Borders, Westpac emergency Helicopter.
Yes, I believe that we have to look after ourselves first and then if possible to others. "Charity begins at home!"
Like parents we must take some care of ourselves, so to be able to help others.
At the moment I believe as Australians we all need to chip in, (for floods etc.) if we create a "Disaster Fund" for this type of thing and keep it going would be really good fo the future. Seriously what is wrong with every-one paying $50 in tax every year?
Reply

emmy19

Posted by: emmy19
Posted: 11th Feb 2011

emmy19 says: No you are not being unfair, I only give to local charities where I can see where the funds are going and I certainly will not give to charities outside my state.
Whilst I sympathise with those affected by recent weather caused problems I refuse to help those who haven't helped us in the past, sorry.
Charity begins at home I was always told Reply

PGS

Posted by: PGS
Posted: 16th Feb 2011

PGS says: RFDS is worthy, but most others are too much of a sham. I see no reason to give to charities when the money is rarely used for it's intended purpose.
So much has been given to the Red Cross, etc during their appeals following:
Tsunami in Thailand/Indonesia (2004)
Victorian Fires
Varying earthquake / flood / cyclone .....
The 2004 collections have not been dispursed to their intended - but have gone to RC coffers.

RC's answer to them not sending it - 'you gave it to us, we do what we like.'

It is not in our interest to provide to the CEO bonus scheme.

Reply

Lozzab

Posted by: Lozzab
Posted: 15th Mar 2011

Lozzab says: I don't know about where "ALL" the money goes, but I can tell you when my house burned down and I lost everything in 1998, I was shocked and surprised when I received a knock at my door and was presented with two very large bags full of groceries and essentials from the Salvation Army.
At the time I didn't feel I deserved it as I worked full time and was insured, thank goodness, but truly it was very gratefully.
I am though, very cautious about who I donate to myself. The Salvation Army is always one of them. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

Lozzab says: I don't know about where "ALL" the money goes, but I can tell you when my house burned down and I lost everything in 1998, I was shocked and surprised when I received a knock at my door and was...

sherri says: Yes, there are a lot of stories about where the Sally Army has arrived on a doorstep unasked at a time of need.
Whenever I hear these stories though I wonder if it was a representative of the local Salvation Army church.
At one time I too thought that they were one and the same thing, and it was not until I met a worker attached to a local church that I realised that sometimes there is a difference. Reply

nelly2

Posted by: nelly2
Posted: 16th Mar 2011

nelly2 says: thats what i would like to know ,you often hear on tv that the money donated has not gone to the charities ,i dont mind giving to them as long as they get it ,the people collecting get money for doing it ,but i think they should do it for free ,thats what charity is .,and there are a lot of reall people out there that need it. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

nelly2 says: thats what i would like to know ,you often hear on tv that the money donated has not gone to the charities ,i dont mind giving to them as long as they get it ,the people collecting get money for...

sherri says: And in another 'interesting' twist, a former volunteer at an agency I know of tells me that the agency now prefers 'subsidised volunteers' -not sure how this works, but apparently there is some sort of subsidy that can be paid to orgs for taking on people who are fulfilling centrelink work requirements. She feels that as an old-age pensioner, her contribution is not quite as valuable!

Now I know that every charity needs to 'turn their dollar over several times before they spend it' - and that with financial situation as it is, that many now HAVE to work reducing the pool of available volunteers, but if she is correct in what she is saying, then this is another sad trend. Reply

Wadjella

Posted by: Wadjella
Posted: 16th Mar 2011

Wadjella says: I have to agree. The charities say that they are transparent but do we really know where our money is being spent and what on.
Too many times the money is not helping the animals or people that they are supposed to help.
When you consider how much is given to charity worldwide, the problems of the world should be sorted.
Just look at live aid. They are just as worse off than before. Reply

Jay

Posted by: Jay
Posted: 17th Mar 2011

Jay says: I read somewhere that charity CEOs get paid an insane salary. All the sums were at least $100k; some going close to the million-dollar mark. Some even get benefits (housing, travel, transportation etc.) on top of their "normal" salary.

I have stopped giving to charities as a result. Correct me if I'm wrong. Reply

sherie333

Posted by: sherie333
Posted: 20th Mar 2011

sherie333 says: Funny you ask that prob less than 5% goes where its meant to. Im not saying dont donate cause if we all did that than the places where the money is been donated will never get anything. But is wrong if you ask me, but i guess they need to be paid. Even the not for profit charities Reply

Nefertari

Posted by: Nefertari
Posted: 3rd Apr 2011

Nefertari says: I do feel a slight bit guilty when someone from a worthwhile charity comes to the door asking for money and I have to say no. However with the cost of living skyrocketing all the time I do have to watch how much I spend and only give every so often. What really annoys me though is how often I get a letter in the mail for a charitable cause asking for donations....if they can afford to send letters out to everybody then they shouldn't need to ask the public for donations! Some time ago I donated money to a worthwhile cause only to read in the paper a few days later that an official working for that same cause had embezzled from the firm he was working for!
Reply

Bru

Posted by: Bru
Posted: 13th Apr 2011

Bru says: I find these days I will give to charities that are shaking cans in the street and those that I normally support I will sell raffle tickets to family for or make a direct donation. For disaster relief ass for example the Queensland floods I donate directly to the bank in a reputable account such as The Lord Mayor's Appeal. I do not however give to door to door charities other than the Red Cross and the Salvos as I know them to be staffed by unpaid volunteers. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

Bru says: I find these days I will give to charities that are shaking cans in the street and those that I normally support I will sell raffle tickets to family for or make a direct donation. For disaster...

sherri says: i used to feel comfortable about giving money to the tin-rattlers, and purchasing raffle-tickets, having worked for an org that had a button day I knew how the money was processed (and it was kosher). - and I assumed that that it was the same accountability re raffle tickets.

But I will now think twice about raffle tickets. -not so much re the money but with regards to what they do with my information after receiving a begging phone-call on my mobile. (I only ever use my mobile number in situations that I think are 'secure')

I DID NOT authorise my information to be used in this way, and I am yet to see anything on a raffle ticket that implies permission. Some of you will probably say that I am naive, and that this is common practice...but I have never encountered this before. Reply

victory

Posted by: victory
Posted: 18th Apr 2011

victory says: Yes, I agree with what you say where is all the money going they are accountable but the people who give don't hear much about where or what has been spent on!! the reason I say this is because the same people who are in need are still waiting for relief, so why isn't there enough to go round it seems the rich get richer and the poor get poorer!!! Reply

Sammbo

Posted by: Sammbo
Posted: 19th Apr 2011

Sammbo says: I only give to charities that I trust.

There are only three .... the Salvation Army, Red Cross and the RSPCA.

Even Vision Australia is suspicious |(in my eyes). Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 19th Apr 2011

Sammbo says: I only give to charities that I trust.

There are only three .... the Salvation Army, Red Cross and the RSPCA.

Even Vision Australia is suspicious |(in my eyes).

Goulah says: That was a very naughty pun. Reply

Sammbo

Posted by: Sammbo
Posted: 20th Apr 2011

Goulah says: That was a very naughty pun.

Sammbo says: heh heh heh.

Glad you saw through it! Reply

mossie

Posted by: mossie
Posted: 19th Apr 2011

mossie says: A friend donated $50 to a charity organisation. They were given a receipt for $45 and when they asked where the other $5 was, they were told that was used for administration costs.
Needless to say they don't donate to this organisation and either do I Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

mossie says: A friend donated $50 to a charity organisation. They were given a receipt for $45 and when they asked where the other $5 was, they were told that was used for administration costs.
Needless to...

sherri says: WHOA! - that is blatant ....but at least it is transparent....which is more than can be said for a lot of other orgs!...and by the sound of things it is a lesser amount than is going as admin for some charities.

Not so sure that I would be donating to them either though!

Proves the point though that a little bit of bad publicity goes a long way! Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 19th Apr 2011

Goulah says: I have not posted on this forum (which I started on a whim almost two years ago) for some time. I have still not been able to work out a viable solution, decided who to trust and how to help.

Easter is just around the corner and the Good Friday Appeal - in Melbourne, Australia - is three days off. I am hoping that on top of all the bushfires, floods and pestilence (yes we also had locusts) over the last couple of years that people will not be scared off by the Government levy for most Australians and no longer contribute. Reply

Jim 007

Posted by: Jim 007
Posted: 3rd May 2011

Jim 007 says: Most collections done by people standing in shopping areas or door to door,get a few extra dollars for the time they give.Also a lot of them need those few extra dollars to survive ,i know of people walking six hours a day for twenty bucks.So all those people who give time and do make a difference,thankyou !Jimbo Reply

dint

Posted by: dint
Posted: 6th May 2011

dint says: i consider the collectors are in need of charity Reply

Laughaminute

Posted by: Laughaminute
Posted: 17th May 2011

Laughaminute says: Collectors are volunteers and as such are not paid. The people behind the scenes are paid a regular wage as that is their job. They don't just work on the collection of funds but work to have leaflets and brochures printed for distribution to the public to help further the cause of that particular charity. This is something I am now familiar with as I am on the board of a charity for which I am also a patient. Until I was appointed to the board, I had no idea of the workings of these charities. Not only do we raise monies for use by our charity, we have a library of equipment to be used by our patient members. We are alway in need of donations of monies so that we are able to help our patient members. We need these pamphlets and brochures to pass out to the public and to members families to be able to educate people. These things all take money - thus we have collections. Reply

Angel

Posted by: Angel
Posted: 17th May 2011

Angel says: I’m very disillusioned with Charities, I would like it stated “how much of the donation given, gets to the people” . Just how much is skimmed off the top for admin ect ?
Reply

Harley man

Posted by: Harley man
Posted: 16th Jun 2011

Harley man says: I am with you if we all consider that only 17 cents in the dollar needs to go to the charities aimed function and all charities paying there top managers $100,000 plus a year I now choose to support none. i now do my own volunteer work in the community and know 100% of my effort is doing someone good. Reply

Jude

Posted by: Jude
Posted: 28th Oct 2011

Jude says: I really don't know where you are coming from. People I know who have been charity collectors don't get much money for the work they do and often collectors are volunteers. Reply

pietam6

Posted by: pietam6
Posted: 4th Nov 2011

pietam6 says: Charity can be a loaded word. Yes, it is disappointing to learn these 'wide eyed kids' are not doing it for the love of it, but for money. Not made of money myself, there are a few important causes that I cannot pass up...Salvos, they are always first on the scene. The RCG Foundation and RSPCA for without those, children and animals are so dependent on those around to ensure a decent quality of life, and Karuna, the wonderful Buddhist nursing and spiritual centre for the dying and those looking after them. Feel it is always important to give back, it makes us who we are! Volunteering is also a marvellous way of giving back. I teach English to migrants and refugees, and always get far more than I put in. The people are so brave and humorous, and determined. It makes you, proud to be part of it. After a day in class, my cheeks ache from smiling and I leave on such a natural 'high'. I am one of hundreds of volunteers in this great country. Reply

pauline

Posted by: pauline
Posted: 11th Nov 2011

pauline says: i think most of the local charities can reach out to the needs more easily and i know few people who work for the charity for free and they have staff who r paid to the minimum wages.so all the money that is collected are spent to the needy and deserved people. Reply

ninna

Posted by: ninna
Posted: 22nd Nov 2011

ninna says: The best charity organisations are those that are local to your community or have proven their value over time. Places such as Red cross & salvos do a great job & it shows but you go to the larger organisations that provide for overseas you will see a huge amount of wasted funds. Far too much money is wasted in those type of charities & I will never contribute to them for that reason. These days I cannot afford to donate much but there are times when volunteer firefighters have deserved our help & I have done so willingly with money or buying them a box of bottled water to drop off where they are fighting bush fires in my area.
We have the right to say where our money goes & choosing a charity is a personal choice that needs to be respected, it is hard to refuse door knockers or kids asking to be sponsored but if your donation is not reaching the intended destination without being eaten up by admin costs then what is the point. Many charities work on the compassionate side of yr nature, by making you feel guilty about being better off than those sad children on the TV ads. The funds do not reach those children in it's full form, by the time they see any of it it will be less than half.
There are so many more deserving charities that do not have the funds to advertise who need our help more, that can also be done by being a volunteer. The local charities are sadly lacking in helpers to the extreme of having to take on people who are doing community service which can place a bigger load on their resources than it should. If you wish to contribute as a volunteer have a look around, nursing homes, disability centres, community cottages & neighbourhood centres are only a few places that need help but don't get it. They rely mainly on govt funding to survive which does not allow for any extras that the people using those services might need above the basics. Reply

mysteron347

Posted by: mysteron347
Posted: 22nd Nov 2011

mysteron347 says: Personally, I gave up contributing to charities many years ago...not that I've had an appropriate income for years, anyway.

One reason was the small print on the UNICEF form which said that $2 from each contribution was for 'local advocacy' (ie. feeding fat lawyers)

Then there was the heartbreaking tale from the Red Cross. Apparently, this character had children that he couldn't really afford and when the wife produced a pair of twins in addition, it was really, really difficult for them. Now the wife's pregnant again, so I really, really need to dip into my pocket to help them out...

I used to give to the Flying Doctor when I was working, and I also volunteered at a disabilities-support charity while I was waiting for a phantom job to come up. That ended when I finally got sick of the boss systematically un-doing (with paid labour) what I had been doing.

So now, about all I do is to toss my income from survey sites to KIVA. KIVA allows you to underwrite loans made mainly to people in third-world countries. You provide $25 and then choose which borrower you'll trust to repay the loan. The borrower pays interest to pay for their local administration (better rates than the local money-lender) and the loan you made is returned to you monthly over typically, 8 months to 2 years.

Since the borrower repays the loan and chooses the purpose, they take ownership of the situation - it's not something provided as a handout.

According to their figures, 98.93% of loans made are repaid. When you get repaid, you can do what you like with YOUR money. Put it in your pocket, if you want. Most people just underwrite another loan. It's addictive. Reply

sherri

Posted by: sherri
Posted: 3rd Dec 2011

mysteron347 says: Personally, I gave up contributing to charities many years ago...not that I've had an appropriate income for years, anyway.

One reason was the small print on the UNICEF form which said...

sherri says: good to meet another KIVA fan! Reply

hicks338

Posted by: hicks338
Posted: 22nd Nov 2011

hicks338 says: I often wonder where all the money goes, administration costs are pretty high, I volunteer my time with one of the Charity organisations, can tell you that the staff never help out in one of the stores, if the paid boss is away the volunteers have to run it, while staff sit in the office and collect a nice wage. Another hefty cost is t getting rid of dirty clothing and rubbish that some people donate, we are used as a rubbish dump at times. Reply

steve

Posted by: steve
Posted: 22nd Nov 2011

steve says: I do not mind them being paid what I do mind is thr amount of what the collect the should get less than they do after all thier doing it for a charity who should get some what more than they do now. Reply

steve

Posted by: steve
Posted: 22nd Nov 2011

steve says: It is not the charity that gets the persentage of the money it is the people who hire the collectors.So do not jump down on charities if they got a larger share they would not have to hire these poeple so often. Reply

Mala

Posted by: Mala
Posted: 5th Dec 2011

Mala says: Im a volunteer for Red Cross- we do have a shop that is frequented by those on low incomes-students-lst time flatter anyone really who buy clothing, games for kids, crockery, cutlery all sorts. We help out when disasters strike.We really appreciate all donations, monetary, clothing anything people give us,, volunteers are always welcomed and needed. We don't drive flashy cars or get paid. PS we also deliver meals, it is all for Charity. Thankyou Reply

Dani

Posted by: Dani
Posted: 14th Dec 2011

Dani says: i think i have to agree most of the money must be going somewhere and we hardly ever hear of it doing anything and who pays the big workers in the charity they don't all volunteer but some money i believe must go to the people they are collecting for so its better i believe to make a big donation so more of it gos to the people they are collecting for well thats what ive always thought. Reply

heatherch

Posted by: heatherch
Posted: 21st Dec 2011

heatherch says: I donate mainly to the ones that I can see are doing something for their charity with the money rather than paying people to collect money for them & directors etc being paid money, I like it to go to the people or animals that need it the most Reply

terry

Posted by: terry
Posted: 22nd Dec 2011

terry says: I always ask charities what % of their gross reciepts is available for distribution. The best I have seen is 93% --I consider that that 7% to cover overheads is excellent, most others seem to run about 20% Reply

Oliveface

Posted by: Oliveface
Posted: 12th Feb 2012

Oliveface says: What I have learnt is Caritas Australia donates every cent to charity. Most other so-called non charitable organisations spend some parts of the collection paying staff to do fund raising and run a reasonably cosy office. I guess people who are working to raise funds need some money in their pockets as well for a living (in other words they take it as a paid job to help others). We have to realise from our end that we are helping those jobless souls as well ... to help feed other hungry, homeless in third world countries. Reply

shafeel

Posted by: shafeel
Posted: 14th Feb 2012

shafeel says: unicef is the best one as i have been receiving letters from them Reply

CaityWaity92

Posted by: CaityWaity92
Posted: 15th Feb 2012

CaityWaity92 says: I used to be one... didnt make a "sale" no money for you to pay for anything.. and at 100 per person... i would need at least 18 a week :( Reply

Glowz

Posted by: Glowz
Posted: 18th Feb 2012

Glowz says: No you are not unfair i was actually blown away when applying for a job that the guy who was looking for people to work to help for cancer research and that, he said that the money collected you should be an honest and reliable person who would door knock and collect for cancer causes, and then i asked how do we get paid and how much his reply is that we only get paid with how much we collect after door knocking in what ever area you live in. Tell me am i making a big out of this but i dont see that as a good thing at all collecting all money that suppose to be for cancer research causes and you get to keep that of what you can collect. Reply

Kessa

Posted by: Kessa
Posted: 18th Feb 2012

Kessa says: Hubby and I support Angel Flight & RFDS as we have friends who live in isolated areas. We also support Australian Lutheran World Service, the AGL Rescue Helicopter (which used to be the Energex Rescue Helicopter), Scripture Union Chaplaincy Fund and Australian Working Dog Rescue (as I am one of their foster carers). We allocate a certain amount from out household budget each year for donations and apart from these specific charities also give a few dollars here and there to Breast Cancer Research, Surf Lifesavers, our local Bush Fire Brigade to name a few. Reply

marg

Posted by: marg
Posted: 17th Mar 2012

marg says: I think it is about time that these so caled charity services were pulled in line as most of the money doesnt even get to where it suposed too I give donation to the wespac helicotper service as they are totally funded by donations also if needed there service is free of charge friends of mine have had to go to sydney hospital in dire straits anand were flown there by the service ... Reply

Mp

Posted by: Mp
Posted: 17th Mar 2012

Mp says: Goulah - I really don't think you are being unfair. My donations to charity ceased after the Bali bombings when the Red Cross of all places did NOT help out victims of this horrendous event here in Australia. They, the victims or victims families simply did not receive what we we Australians donated.

I have ceased donating completely after this we seem to help out all others except people in Australia. I know it seems very harsh but I do not condone the % of funds raised that go to admin fees, call centres etc.

I do donate clothing to Churches that have Op Shops.

I have lost confidence in so called Charities! Reply

Andree72

Posted by: Andree72
Posted: 22nd Jun 2012

Andree72 says: I would like to see charities forced to print how the donations are spent and then I can choose which are doing the best job and donate accordingly Reply

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