Cafe Chat Discussion

  • Goulah
    Goulah
    Posted on:
    15th May 2009 11:47pm

    Last Post 23rd Jun 2012
    Replies     130

    Am i being unfair?

    With most charity collectors getting paid a hefty "wage", where is the money really going? Which charities actually give all the money to the people they are collecting for?

  • solstice
    solstice
    Posted on:
    15th Jun 2009 08:50am

    solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

  • Goulah
    Goulah
    Posted on:
    27th Jul 2010 10:13pm

    solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

    Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

  • baggage
    baggage
    Posted on:
    24th Jun 2011 11:54pm

    Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

    baggage says: this is not a concern of what people are doing around corner, main issue is to help those in need, appreciate low cost prices in charity shops, this might keep a baby worn, or work pants for men, cardigan for you mum. I strongly oppose your comments and who cares what people do?

  • Ceci
    Ceci
    Posted on:
    23rd Jun 2012 09:01am

    baggage says: this is not a concern of what people are doing around corner, main issue is to help those in need, appreciate low cost prices in charity shops, this might keep a baby worn, or work pants for men,...

    Ceci says: Probably it is not a struggle for you to donate, but for the rest of us it is. So why all my effort should go to some warm, well dressed two hour "worker" while the real people in need are left with barely nothing. There's gotta be another way to donate without being abused, which actually defeats the purpose of the donation itself.

  • Oliveface
    Oliveface
    Posted on:
    12th Feb 2012 05:42pm

    Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

    Oliveface says: One of our human weakness is to judge others by what they do and what you see. Who knows what these executives are doing - attending meetings and going from one place to another - they need a reliable car to travel.

  • Eileen
    Eileen
    Posted on:
    18th Feb 2012 08:48am

    Goulah says: I used to live over the road from a well known charity and the "directors" used to drive high end cars and keep very short office hours. I tended to be soured by that experience.

    Eileen says: That doesn't mean all charities are like this. For more than 20 years I raised money through my school for UNICEF where I could see that 95% of money raised gets to those children and mothers in need during World crises. UNICEF asks where you want the money to be spent, send you the results, provides annual report on its spending, accounting and the wages paid to just a small few who are required for clerical, legal and administration purposes. Almost everyone else is an unpaid volunteer.

  • Rachel
    Rachel
    Posted on:
    29th Apr 2011 07:52pm

    solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

    Rachel says: No this is true but a lot of them do employ cheap labour (on commission basis)
    and program them to market a speech specially designed to get you to donate even after you have said NO!

  • baggage
    baggage
    Posted on:
    24th Jun 2011 11:51pm

    solstice says: None that i can recall dont have big flash offices with multiples of staff all being paid mega $'s.

    baggage says: I agree with yourself solstice, being a single mum I visit a lot of charity organisations, people work there don't get paid mega dollars, Until you really have a changing experience in your life, these organisations are a true blessing. As I always say never judge a book by its cover, as you never know what's around the corner!

  • meow
    meow
    Posted on:
    11th Dec 2009 03:39pm

    meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all volunteer based in my area, so maybe thats the way to go?

  • Anzacbaby
    Anzacbaby
    Posted on:
    16th Dec 2009 03:21am

    meow says: I have never really thought of it. I've always donated to the smaller, local charities as I believe they would be more appreaciative of the smaller amounts. A lot of the local charities are all...

    Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of me.
    This may be because our family have received some very generous, and much needed support from some charities (Variety Club, Lions Club and Local Rotary) when our (now deceased daughter) required expensive equipment which wasn't funded.
    For the same reason we support the RCH Good Friday Appeal also.
    I think it is important to give whatever you can to help others less fortunate.

  • niecie
    niecie
    Posted on:
    17th Dec 2009 12:18am

    Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

    niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I do not support overseas charitiies as I believe that too much of the money is used for the wrong purposes.

  • Jen
    Jen
    Posted on:
    13th May 2010 06:57pm

    niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I...

    Jen says: I recently heard about Angel Flight, which I initially thought was only for children. But it is entirely funded by donations from the public to assist those in remote areas to get to medical treatment in cities or larger base hospitals.

    I live hundreds of klm away from any metro area and my husband needs to access medical care on an ongoing basis. Angel Flight is there with pilots who volunteer their time, their planes and their own resourses to make these trips available to all who need them.

    If you want to donate to something worthwhile, this is one charity that is making a huge difference to people's lives here in remote parts of Australia and even in not so remote areas where there is no spcialist services available.

    There are "Ground Angels" too, ones who will meet the plane and take the person and their carer to their appointment or hospital.

    What wonderful people!
    They only have small overheads too, operating out of an office in Brisbane, so the money you donate goes to where it is needed.

    Tell your friends!

  • Goulah
    Goulah
    Posted on:
    27th Jul 2010 10:19pm

    Jen says: I recently heard about Angel Flight, which I initially thought was only for children. But it is entirely funded by donations from the public to assist those in remote areas to get to medical...

    Goulah says: Quite often at work I collect money for charity (when we have our casual Fridays) and I was horrified when so few knew about the RFDS and similar organisations. To try and overcome that particular problem I put posters up in the tea room to highlight the work done by them.

  • Kessa
    Kessa
    Posted on:
    18th Feb 2012 03:42pm

    Jen says: I recently heard about Angel Flight, which I initially thought was only for children. But it is entirely funded by donations from the public to assist those in remote areas to get to medical...

    Kessa says: Yes, Angel Flight is one I support as I know how difficult it can be for people who are isolated on properties in remote areas of Australia.

  • Goulah
    Goulah
    Posted on:
    27th Jul 2010 10:17pm

    niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I...

    Goulah says: For some reason I have always found that the RFDS is one of my favourites. Not sure if it is because of the sterling work they do under such harsh conditions or for their pioneering spirit.

  • Elle
    Elle
    Posted on:
    8th Nov 2010 10:06pm

    Goulah says: For some reason I have always found that the RFDS is one of my favourites. Not sure if it is because of the sterling work they do under such harsh conditions or for their pioneering spirit.

    Elle says: I agree with donating to the RFDS. Another very worthwhile one is the Seeing eye Dog charity, as is the animal refuge and RSPCA> These are all our own charities, and ones which serve those who cannot help themselves. These days of financial crisis makes it hard for pensioners to select those they'd love to donate to if they had sufficient funds, so it is a good idea to rotate them as one can.
    Elle

  • Ollie
    Ollie
    Posted on:
    16th Nov 2010 11:07pm

    Elle says: I agree with donating to the RFDS. Another very worthwhile one is the Seeing eye Dog charity, as is the animal refuge and RSPCA> These are all our own charities, and ones which serve those who...

    Ollie says: Your choices Elle are similar to mine. Guide Dogs; Red Cross; RCH; RSPCA & Cancer Research. Since traveling in the outback, I noted local (often very small) communities, volunteering their time and energy to continually raise funds for RFDS, so I have added that too. Local disasters also benefit from time to time (bushfires/ floods/ cyclones etc)
    I agree with others who have mentioned 'local' and genuine, for once I gave to some international animal welfare group (the specific title escapes me) , then EVERY MONTH from then on they sent much paraphenalia, which in the end must have cost more then what I donated. I was so furious, that I NEVER gave another thing. I understand that some advertising is necessary, but to so constantly overload and harrass, a person who had given what they could, was just total waste, waste, waste. ..
    This went on for about 2years, after which I actually moved addresses (not for that reason) but I often imagine they are still sending their stuff.
    Those address labels annoy me too, for it is not asked for, does cost something to produce, and once I receive them, I say thank you, recycle the rest of the paper and give NOTHING, as all I see is a waste of precious donations.
    There are some very reputable charities, just a pity that the shonky ones tend to degrade their reputation.

  • curleyross
    curleyross
    Posted on:
    17th Nov 2010 12:13am

    Ollie says: Your choices Elle are similar to mine. Guide Dogs; Red Cross; RCH; RSPCA & Cancer Research. Since traveling in the outback, I noted local (often very small) communities, volunteering their time...

    curleyross says: Yes, i agree. I think Charity worker should set the benchmark and have a modest office and salary but demonstrate that all monies riased go directly to their cause in the community.

  • Eileen
    Eileen
    Posted on:
    18th Feb 2012 08:44am

    niecie says: I support Australian charities such as Care Flight and Flying Doctor Service as they provide an important service to outback Australia where doctors and hospitals are thousands of miles away. I...

    Eileen says: I have started my own little charity in response to the need I saw in villages in eastern Bali. I am a pensioner and yet I hold fundraising barbecues, golf days, concerts, raffles etc as my heart broke when I discovered that children cannot go to school unless parents can pay and so many teenagers were unable to get jobs because they had no schooling. These people had nothing but welcomed me, shared their meagre food and wanted to show me the beauty of their little island which is suppressed and suffering under Indonesia's yoke.
    I collect clothing, football boots, uniforms and money over to my villages and decide who gets what. I have within four years, furnished two classrooms, provided school uniforms for two year groups, got five soccer teams playing in a league, paid schooling for two children until they leave and donated food and clothing to so many beautiful, grateful people. Yes there are great needs here in Australia too but we must act where our hearts respond and not say one need is greater than another. For years I worked to raise money for UNICEF where 95% of the donations go to children in crisis throughout the world. The worst thing is to do nothing!

  • Goulah
    Goulah
    Posted on:
    27th Jul 2010 10:16pm

    Anzacbaby says: Must admit I am a bit of a sucker when it comes to supporting charities. While I have some that I support faithfully, i also feel obliged to pop a few coins into any tin rattled in front of...

    Goulah says: Yes it can be very hard to decide to donate to one over the other. There are so many truly worthy causes.

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