Cafe Chat Discussion

  • Mick
    Mick
    Posted on:
    13th Jun 2011 11:56am

    Last Post 2nd Nov 2012
    Replies     29

    Charities

    Most Charities are funded mainly by the Government, but love to take all the credit, let all charities give credit where that happens

  • Grindy
    Grindy
    Posted on:
    4th Nov 2011 01:38pm

    Grindy says: I know of a charity that does not receive Govt funding, and does not get media coverage nor many positive responses from grant applications but helps hundreds upon hundreds of families. The volunteers use their own fuel and resources most of the time to help people going through tough times.

  • Mick
    Mick
    Posted on:
    4th Nov 2011 04:02pm

    Grindy says: I know of a charity that does not receive Govt funding, and does not get media coverage nor many positive responses from grant applications but helps hundreds upon hundreds of families. The ...

    Mick says: Which charity is that grindy ?you have to let people know

  • Grindy
    Grindy
    Posted on:
    4th Nov 2011 04:37pm

    Mick says: Which charity is that grindy ?you have to let people know

    Grindy says: Care Outreach based in Queensland is the charity. It has been operating for 17 or so years....



  • di
    di
    Posted on:
    2nd Nov 2012 10:10pm

    Grindy says: Care Outreach based in Queensland is the charity. It has been operating for 17 or so years....

    di says: Grindy I am not questioning your honesty, but let us know how you come to know so much about this charity & how we get in touch with them.
    Di

  • Eileen
    Eileen
    Posted on:
    2nd Nov 2012 09:39pm

    Mick says: Which charity is that grindy ?you have to let people know

    Eileen says: Mick, my husband and I are Aussie pensioners but we have our own little charity called Boots for Bali which supplies soccer and other sports gear to poor East Bali villages. We also sponsor a kindergarten and in four years have furnished two rooms, provided uniforms, two security gates, playground equipment, stationery, a kitchen so children can have breakfast, and paid three years lease for them. We have supplied five villages with soccer shirts, boots etc and paid for them to join the local association. There are many, many people like us who do what we can, without any help from any Governments. We fundraise, run raffles, sausage sizzles, second hand book fairs and charity golf days. On our last visit, last month (October) we were overjoyed to see that 9 special needs children were now able to attend our kindy FREE OF CHARGE because of the help we have given. This is the only kindergarten in bali which is free for the local village children. Don't be inactive because of your sceptisim. You too can make a difference to someone else in need, no matter how small.

  • Blossom
    Blossom
    Posted on:
    19th May 2012 01:22pm

    Grindy says: I know of a charity that does not receive Govt funding, and does not get media coverage nor many positive responses from grant applications but helps hundreds upon hundreds of families. The ...

    Blossom says: I met a lady from Red Cross last week. Some of the Volunteers actually pay for services they provide themselves. e.g. they run a phone call system. They contact people to check that they are OK - on their own home phones. Those who have uniforms pay for them themselves too. During WW11 my now late Mother together (with a lot of friends of hers) was in the voluntary Red Cross and assisted at several hospitals and convelescent homes. Some of the hospitals were short-staffed as some had gone overseas, either with the armed forces or as volunteers. They weren't allowed to give medication but assisted by bathing, feeding and in some cases changing bandages if they had first aid/ home nursing certificates. They paid for their own uniforms (and had to use their coupons), and had to have different things in addition. One thing was changed so they had to buy extra things so they matched.

  • mizz
    mizz
    Posted on:
    20th Oct 2012 02:14pm

    Blossom says: I met a lady from Red Cross last week. Some of the Volunteers actually pay for services they provide themselves. e.g. they run a phone call system. They contact people to check that they are OK -...

    mizz says: There have been specifically humanist charities in the past where there was a specific need. When sheltered housing for the elderly and adoption were dominated by religious charities, the BHA set up pioneering charities that did excellent work in those two fields. When specifically humanist provision was no longer required, they merged with larger, mainstream charities in their fields.

  • Mick
    Mick
    Posted on:
    4th Nov 2011 05:45pm

    Mick says: Great to hear, obviously genuine people running it



  • sherri
    sherri
    Posted on:
    22nd Nov 2011 11:31am

    sherri says: Not really understanding what you are getting at here Mick.

    I know that where charities do receive some government funding they are required to acknowledge that for that particular program - you will usually see that fact printed on their pamphlets etc. But charities - particularly the larger ones run multiple programs, and not all of these are government funded, - and even where they are, the government may not fund ALL of the program.

    And some charities will receive a grant to run a particular program.

    And some receive no funding at all.

    It is a real mixed bag! - but rest assured, where a charity receives government funding for a program, they are required to acnowledge that.

  • seesaw
    seesaw
    Posted on:
    28th Dec 2011 04:21pm

    sherri says: Not really understanding what you are getting at here Mick.

    I know that where charities do receive some government funding they are required to acknowledge that for that particular...

    seesaw says: I donote to children,s Charities,mosty the Cancer Research programs,and I often wonder,just how much goes to the actual charity,or to pay the helpers,I have been told that most charities,only get around 20cents of a dollar,the rest go towards administration fees,I would like to find out if this is right or not,sometimes on the phone when I have been unable to help,they can get very rude,and make a person feel guilty.

  • sherri
    sherri
    Posted on:
    28th Dec 2011 06:14pm

    seesaw says: I donote to children,s Charities,mosty the Cancer Research programs,and I often wonder,just how much goes to the actual charity,or to pay the helpers,I have been told that most charities,only get...

    sherri says: yes, I know what you mean. - as I have said elsewhere on this site, I am now very picky how and where I spend my charity $, preferring to spend it ethically. (extremely sad and ironical to say that not all charities are ethical!! - I feel that more of a $ that I donate to an organisation that behaves ethically is likely to get through to those who need it.)

    My personal motto is if an organization cold calls me, then I cross them off my list - and tell the caller that I have done so.

    And most definitely, a caller who is rude or otherwise behaves inappropriately earns a complaint letter to the organization! - PARTICULARLY since many charities now 'outsource' their phone-canvassing. (I think that some of them even employ people from overseas - which FURTHER reduces accountability.)

    If charities realize that using cold-calling, - particularly with rude staff, or utilizing emotional blackmail REDUCES the chance of people donating, then they will stop doing it.

  • mizz
    mizz
    Posted on:
    20th Oct 2012 02:15pm

    sherri says: yes, I know what you mean. - as I have said elsewhere on this site, I am now very picky how and where I spend my charity $, preferring to spend it ethically. (extremely sad and ironical to say...

    mizz says: BHA members give money and/or time generously and regularly to an average of 6 charities each. Humanists tend to plan their giving rationally and selectively, but most also respond generously to emergency appeals and street collections. The most popular causes were those connected with social welfare (27%) and international development/aid (21%). Only 2 out of 676 respondents did not support charitable giving. (BHA survey in Humanity, 2000). For comparison: according to a Mori survey for Nestlé Family Monitor in 2000, just under half the British public undertook voluntary work that year, and 92% had given money to at least one charity. 1 in 5 gave regularly, and 1 in 5 was a member of a charity, though the most popular forms of giving were to street collections (55%) and to door-to-door collections (50%). Only 36% of the general public contributed to 5 or more charities. Children’s charities and medical research charities were the most popular.

  • sherri
    sherri
    Posted on:
    28th Dec 2011 06:23pm

    seesaw says: I donote to children,s Charities,mosty the Cancer Research programs,and I often wonder,just how much goes to the actual charity,or to pay the helpers,I have been told that most charities,only get...

    sherri says: yes seesaw, a lot (if not all) orgs cream off some of the donated $ for administration. And where they say that they do not, sometimes it is because they have alternative untied money that they are able to use for administration. I understand that it does cost money to run an organization, even if it is just to buy photocopy paper...but I DO object strongly to 'top heavy' organizations who seem to exist just to pay their administrative staff!

    - and there is a HUGE variance in the percentage that is utilised as administration - but any organisation should be able to tell you what proportion is used in admin. (and, as I said if they say that NO money is siphoned off, then it also pays to ask how their admin costs are paid.) It is up to you as a donor to decide how much you think is acceptable.

    You should be able to ask for and receive an audited financial report,- and any organisation that is not transparent about that sort of thing does not get my money.

  • Blossom
    Blossom
    Posted on:
    19th May 2012 01:25pm

    sherri says: yes seesaw, a lot (if not all) orgs cream off some of the donated $ for administration. And where they say that they do not, sometimes it is because they have alternative untied money that they are...

    Blossom says: Some of the admin money is used for electricity and rent of buildings.

  • mizz
    mizz
    Posted on:
    20th Oct 2012 02:14pm

    Blossom says: Some of the admin money is used for electricity and rent of buildings.

    mizz says: BHA members give money and/or time generously and regularly to an average of 6 charities each. Humanists tend to plan their giving rationally and selectively, but most also respond generously to emergency appeals and street collections. The most popular causes were those connected with social welfare (27%) and international development/aid (21%). Only 2 out of 676 respondents did not support charitable giving. (BHA survey in Humanity, 2000). For comparison: according to a Mori survey for Nestlé Family Monitor in 2000, just under half the British public undertook voluntary work that year, and 92% had given money to at least one charity. 1 in 5 gave regularly, and 1 in 5 was a member of a charity, though the most popular forms of giving were to street collections (55%) and to door-to-door collections (50%). Only 36% of the general public contributed to 5 or more charities. Children’s charities and medical research charities were the most popular.

  • GG
    GG
    Posted on:
    15th Mar 2012 02:23am

    GG says: yes seesaw, a lot (if not all) orgs cream off some of the donated $ for administration. And where they say that they do not, sometimes it is because they have alternative untied money that they are able to use for administration. I understand that it does cost money to run an organization, even if it is just to buy photocopy paper...but I DO object strongly to 'top heavy' organizations who seem to exist just to pay their administrative staff!

    - and there is a HUGE variance in the percentage that is utilised as administration - but any organisation should be able to tell you what proportion is used in admin. (and, as I said if they say that NO money is siphoned off, then it also pays to ask how their admin costs are paid.) It is up to you as a donor to decide how much you think is acceptable.

    You should be able to ask for and receive an audited financial report,- and any organisation that is not transparent about that sort of thing does not get my money.

  • Mandymoo
    Mandymoo
    Posted on:
    16th Mar 2012 08:03pm

    Mandymoo says: I support TEAR which allows you to buy a chicken or school supplies. I give them as gifts to family members like my Nan, who doesn't need anything but I still like to give something. She likes the cards and likes to see what the money is going towards. It is also not run by the government and I feel like my money is actually going towards something specific not a charities coffers.

  • Chezz5
    Chezz5
    Posted on:
    16th Mar 2012 11:36pm

    Chezz5 says: The trouble is I only have so much to go round and there are just sooooooo many good and worthwhile causes so I try and limit my charity dollar to a few. I support a child through world Vision and I always donate to Multiple Sclerosis as my sister died from the disease and I have a brother and a nephew who has it. Having just visited South Sudan and a little school in Bor called Ducuum, I am trying to raise money for that. It was such a privilege to be the person who gave them their first books, pens, pencils and paper and so humbling as I represented my school community which has everything. the teachers hadn't been paid in months and there was only one long drop loo, one pump and, in essence, mostly just goodwill and hope.

  • marg
    marg
    Posted on:
    17th Mar 2012 09:53am

    marg says: I always help out the westpac helicopter as they are totally reliant on charity I have had friends that have needed them in health situations and they are free if u r in need of them ....which was news to me .....

  • mizz
    mizz
    Posted on:
    20th Oct 2012 02:15pm

    marg says: I always help out the westpac helicopter as they are totally reliant on charity I have had friends that have needed them in health situations and they are free if u r in need of them ....which was...

    mizz says: BHA members give money and/or time generously and regularly to an average of 6 charities each. Humanists tend to plan their giving rationally and selectively, but most also respond generously to emergency appeals and street collections. The most popular causes were those connected with social welfare (27%) and international development/aid (21%). Only 2 out of 676 respondents did not support charitable giving. (BHA survey in Humanity, 2000). For comparison: according to a Mori survey for Nestlé Family Monitor in 2000, just under half the British public undertook voluntary work that year, and 92% had given money to at least one charity. 1 in 5 gave regularly, and 1 in 5 was a member of a charity, though the most popular forms of giving were to street collections (55%) and to door-to-door collections (50%). Only 36% of the general public contributed to 5 or more charities. Children’s charities and medical research charities were the most popular.

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