Image

Charities on a budget!

I'm on a disability pension and barely have enough to live on. So I have to be choosy and creative. There is a site called i-donate which sends you emails and donates money to your chosen charity via the points you accumulate.
I never give to charities that ring me up because they get too pushy.
I will always support local raffles.
And I give my time at the local neighbourhood house.

Last reply: 31st Mar 2014 / 22 replies / Post by moreta

Reply to this topic

Replies

foxy

Posted by: foxy
Posted: 24th Jun 2011

foxy says: I have also been on a disabled pension, now an old age one, and find it difficult and depressing, particularly when a charity that I normally would support rings. I have asked them to take me off their lists, and most co-operate when you explain that you will never have extra money, and the phone calls only depress you more. Thank you for 'i-donate' as I will join.
I also support local activities, and enjoy doing that, I join groups and help out where I can, eg office bearer, like secretary or publicity or similar. I'm now joining a neighbourhood group as a 'home visitor' as I drive to places and can sit and talk for people that can't get out. Reply

grahami2006

Posted by: grahami2006
Posted: 7th Feb 2013

foxy says: I have also been on a disabled pension, now an old age one, and find it difficult and depressing, particularly when a charity that I normally would support rings. I have asked them to take me off...

grahami2006 says: Also on aged pension however I try every month to donate to Red Cross. Sometimes not easy but always try to give a little. Reply

marlu

Posted by: marlu
Posted: 23rd Mar 2014

foxy says: I have also been on a disabled pension, now an old age one, and find it difficult and depressing, particularly when a charity that I normally would support rings. I have asked them to take me off...

marlu says: I am on a disability pension but try to give a little each month .There are always people worst off than me. I support natural disasters like the Dollar For Drought campaign which is crucial to supporting our farmers because we all rely on them for food. Giving the occasional dollar does not break the bank balance I will not support charities by phone because I do not know if they are genuine. Having a private number combats that problem. The other way I support charities is to sign petitions for environmental organizations which is just as good as giving , money Reply

goldie27

Posted by: goldie27
Posted: 26th Mar 2014

foxy says: I have also been on a disabled pension, now an old age one, and find it difficult and depressing, particularly when a charity that I normally would support rings. I have asked them to take me off...

goldie27 says: I agree. I try to interrupt the callers story (even though they dont come up for air for long) and I explain that I too am on a pension and cannot afford to support a charity at this time. Only, to be told, we can take your payment now but the draw is two months away, or can you not just afford a smaller book etc. I would love to be in a position to support many charities but I just cant, and I really dont need to be made to feel guilty about it. Reply

SereneBee

Posted by: SereneBee
Posted: 24th Jun 2011

SereneBee says: And another thing about most charities that ring -usually at a most inconvenient time- is that they not only pay the people to ring but they buy lists. I found this out because I volunteer at my local Vinnies op-shop yet they kept sending me "begging letters" -- when I queried this as I'm now on a limited income I was told hat they not only pay the people to ring but they buy lists. Obviously I'd donated last century. Reply

Trushka

Posted by: Trushka
Posted: 21st Apr 2012

SereneBee says: And another thing about most charities that ring -usually at a most inconvenient time- is that they not only pay the people to ring but they buy lists. I found this out because I volunteer at my...

Trushka says: Yes, I agree, charities tend to ring at inconvenient times. I've registered for the 'no not call' and that's eliminated non-charity callers. Now I leave the answering machine on and monitor calls. Life's much better! Reply

Di

Posted by: Di
Posted: 19th Feb 2012

Di says: I like to donate to only 2or3 charities and stick to that rather than spread thinly over many. Hospice and Rescue Helocopter and Air Ambulance are my choice. I don't know about you but I tend to choose Charities relevant to me. Reply

frannymanny

Posted by: frannymanny
Posted: 20th Mar 2013

Di says: I like to donate to only 2or3 charities and stick to that rather than spread thinly over many. Hospice and Rescue Helocopter and Air Ambulance are my choice. I don't know about you but I tend to...

frannymanny says: I'm with you Di. I used to have direct debit of 20 to30 per month to 5 different charities but I just cannot do it any more. I had to cut it down to a world vision child and another international aid group.
I do a lot of voluntary work and feel that if I give time at home and money abroad that is a good balance.
Reply

mauvehaze

Posted by: mauvehaze
Posted: 26th Feb 2012

mauvehaze says: I too, am on a disability pension. I rent a small unit privately as there is not enough public housing in my area. I'm $190 per week worse off than someone in a HomesWest rental, even though I do get rent assistance. The rent I pay is average for this area and lower than anywhere else in this state. I gave up giving cash to charities after working for three months as a telemarketer and realising that the charities are only receiving 5-10% after costs. I donate clothes and homewares that I do not use to charities. I give blood. I also work as a volunteer with people with disabilities. Charity begins at home as they say. I buy my food from a food bank and buy a three course meal from a local centre for $3 where I meet others in a similar predicament, I receive free bread from there as well as inseason fruit or preserves. I also donate items to that centre to be passed on to those people who can use them. I receive subsidised home help as I can no longer do many things for myself. My internet is my only luxury. I am registered with https://www.donotcall.gov.au to deter charities from phoning me. Those that do are told briefly that I used to be a telemarketer and I want to be removed from their calling list immediately as I'll report them if they call me again. Reply

marg

Posted by: marg
Posted: 17th Mar 2012

marg says: I am also on a disability pension and thanks for that will get in touvh with I donate too like you there isnt much left after all the bills have found got a friend and we now pool our money and share and it is so much better .I do give to the westpac helicopter as there totally reliant on charity also if needed they are a free service which i only just found out ....
Reply

Nemeen

Posted by: Nemeen
Posted: 2nd Apr 2012

Nemeen says: We don't have much extra money, I am working two jobs to try to get us through but I have found that donatenow.com.au is good. They have a list of charities and you can select which ones you want, how often you want to donate, the amount and many other things. They don't push you to do anything and you can stop if you need. I have been trying to donate to a couple through them but can't keep it up at the moment. Reply

Captured

Posted by: Captured
Posted: 21st Apr 2012

Captured says: We are another family who very rarely have any "spare" money after bills are paid so i am also very careful with how i give to charities.
We donate clothes in the clothing bins 2-3 times a year, we buy from op-shops and we help to run different fundraising events throughout the year. Once all my kids are at school i would like to help out a bit more. Reply

wojo12

Posted by: wojo12
Posted: 30th Apr 2012

wojo12 says: I would far sooner give $5 to a needy person on the street than to give a donation to a PAID collector. I cannot afford to give much away, but I have serious doubt about how much of our donations gets eroded away by the admin costs and commision to the collectors. Reply

Jezemeg8

Posted by: Jezemeg8
Posted: 21st Jun 2012

Jezemeg8 says: I'm also on a disability pension. One thing I can do however is listen, and I do that each night when Jeze (my service dog) and I head out to the streets to be with the street folk and homeless in the suburbs surrounding where I live.

No, there's not much I can do to improve anyone's situation in a material sense, but I've made many many friends amongst them, and it seems to make a difference to their lives. Sometimes we forget that our most valuable asset costs us nothing Reply

888shelley

Posted by: 888shelley
Posted: 7th Aug 2012

888shelley says: I agree totally with all comments. My hubby and I are on age pension, which enables us to live ok, but we still have to watch every penny. Rent takes nearly half our money and so on.We contribute to some charities by doing their annual door to door collections(which are volunteer basis unpaid) but are giving that up , I am on the do not call register, but I really hate the calls at meal times etc. I have a few charities I prefer to donate to and will continue to give what I can. My other pet peeve is the door to door gas/electricity/phone sellers who simply won't take no for an answer. I am on i-donate as well which although not big donations is at least something. Reply

meg

Posted by: meg
Posted: 5th Feb 2013

meg says: What about charities that send begging letters printed on the best quality paper (3 pages) often with multi-coloured brochures & requests for minimum donations ($50) ? MEG. Reply

PGS

Posted by: PGS
Posted: 28th Jun 2013

meg says: What about charities that send begging letters printed on the best quality paper (3 pages) often with multi-coloured brochures & requests for minimum donations ($50) ? MEG.

PGS says: This comment was removed because the moderators found it broke the house rules. Reply

honeybunny

Posted by: honeybunny
Posted: 12th Jul 2013

meg says: What about charities that send begging letters printed on the best quality paper (3 pages) often with multi-coloured brochures & requests for minimum donations ($50) ? MEG.

honeybunny says: I simply throw the letter in the bin immediately. some of these so called charities I have never heard of before, and that makes me very SUSpect of exactly where the money goes that someone does donate to them
They DO NOT get my money. Reply

Annie_T

Posted by: Annie_T
Posted: 8th Mar 2013

Annie_T says: I had a begging call yesterday which upset me.
I guess they got my mobile number from one the many survey sites where I stated I had diabetes.
She rambled on and on about how many people are diagnosed each year and how much her organisation did research to help eradicate the disease, and that they had made a medical breakthrough.
I listened for an indeterminably long time hoping she would get to the point, interrupted her to ask what the point of the call was. She changed track, and said that she was looking for people who would help so that a new medication would be available on the PBS.
For a moment I thought she might be looking for people for a medical trial or something like that, so I let her ramble on for a while longer until it came to the crunch, she wanted a regular donation of money from me.
I said I was unable to donate as I am on a pension and finding it hard to make ends meet as it is, then said that I was sure that there would be other financial sources the organisation could find instead of pensioners for such an important project.
She answered, with a slightly patronising voice, "we find that people on pensions and low incomes are usually the most generous".
Was that trying to lay a guilt trip on me or what?!
I had already said, NO, but she still tried. I was angry, and finished the conversation with another "NO" and hung up.
I find it hard to believe that an organisation that she described would need to target people doing it tough, because they are the "most generous". If their new drug was so great, they would get the support they need from more relevant sources.
I wonder how many people they have conned, she was very slick.


Reply

osbar

Posted by: osbar
Posted: 15th May 2013

osbar says: Being on my income protection insurance and only receiving 75% of my wage due to a degenerative back disease I am finding it hard to make ends meet but I also believe in giving a little to a charity. I have it taken straight out of my pay so I never miss it and it makes me feel better that I am still giving regularly to others in need.
We also donate any items we no longer need to charities so they can be used by people who need it.
Reply

honeybunny

Posted by: honeybunny
Posted: 12th Jul 2013

honeybunny says: Hi there I too do not give to charities that keep calling for money.
I am part of a Knitting and crochet group - a lovely group of ladies that meet once a week, mostly to just socialise (we do our own thing),
the group as a whole donates regularly throughout the year to local charities only some ladies do more than others, they only donate when and how much they can and it is mainly their time and effort (but no-one is under any pressure), they don't have to, it is completely up to them. The age range of the group is 36 - 86years old. Maybe you might find something like that in your area. Reply

Lizz

Posted by: Lizz
Posted: 31st Mar 2014

Lizz says: When I first had a steadyish income, I sponsored a child in Bolivia. I find this is a good way to make sure you're contributing while not having to put too much thought into it. They only take $40 out of my account each month and I know that the child and their community is greatly benefitting.

Another great way to give to the poor in a round-about way is to shop at salvos or vinnies, and go to the life-line book store. This way you can be buying the things that you need while also donating to a worth-while cause.

I find that if you are really struggling financially, the little things count. Give a dollar to the homeless man you pass in civic. Tip the window-washer a bit more than you usually would. It might not seem like much at the time but it all adds up and you know you're making God smile. Reply

Create a new topic to discuss